Identification and maintenance on old air compressor

by Josh
(Columbus, OH)

Identification and maintenance on old air compressor

Identification and maintenance on old air compressor

Identification and maintenance on old air compressor

My uncle died and left behind this vintage air compressor. We used it together often whenever we used pneumatic tools so I know it works well.


The problem is I was never around to maintain it and now it's my job to make sure it continues to live on.

I believe it was manufactured in the 60s or 70s. 2 piston, single stage, 230VAC.

What I need to know is manuf and part number if possible, if this uses oil, how to change the oil, and where the condensation drain valve is.

Another thing I'm curious about is the motor contactor. I had old literature that came with it and it says it kicks off at a certain pressure and starts at atmospheric pressure by using an exhaust. Can anyone explain how this works?

Comments for Identification and maintenance on old air compressor

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Sep 30, 2018
Worthington
by: Roger

This looks like an old Worthington. Parts may be a problem, as they have been defunct for quite some time. No idea what the model might be.

Sep 14, 2018
Maintenance of an older compressor
by: Doug in s.d.ca.

"What I need to know is manuf and part number if possible, if this uses oil, how to change the oil, and where the condensation drain valve is."

Sorry, no idea what the thing is make and model wise.

But it almost certainly uses oil. Look around the base of the pump - you'll probably see a couple of pope plugs, one coming out horizontally and the other at an upward angle. Those would be the drain and fill holes, respectively.

The condensate drain is almost always near the middle of the tank bottom. If you don't see it try looking for a "mystery valve" almost anywhere else on or near the tank - that's likely it.

You can read about the start-up here:

https://www.about-air-compressors.com/has-unloader-valve-issues.html

Have fun...



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