Water and air compression

by DENNIS DAILY
(Duncan, Ms)

I understand when compressed air forms condensation.


What I don't understand is If the compressed air is hot does it still form condensation because of the squeezing effect you talk about no matter what the temperature is.

say 600 degrees does the compressed air still for condensation and does it ever go back to gas if it is 600 degrees.

Is it when the cold air hits it it turns to condensation. I guess what I am saying is there ever water in the compressor at 600 degrees because of condensation?
Thank You
Dennis Daily
Va80232@gmail.com
I wouldn't know where to find an answer on your site can you email me a copy.

Comments for Water and air compression

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Dec 04, 2014
Thank you Bill
by: Dennis

Thank you Bill

Dec 04, 2014
R.H.
by: Doug in s.d.ca

It's relative humidity.

The warmer the air, and the higher the pressure, the more water can be in vapor form.

Inside the compression chamber, the water will be vapor, as it was in the free air at the intake.

But as soon as the air/water leaves the chamber, the pressure drops, and that causes cooling, which makes the water condense. Once condensed, it tends to stay that way - in the bottom of the tank.

As the tank temperature increases, less water is condensed in the tank, but as air is released into a tool or whatever, it expands and therefore cools even more, which can mean water out of the tool.

Does that help?

Dec 04, 2014
Water in compressed air
by: Bill

Hi Dennis...

Since I don't know where you are, or what type of compressor you are using, it's hard to be specific in answering you.

If your compressor is compressing air, and the relative humidity of the air it is compressing exceeds 100%, then free water forms, regardless of the temperature.

The hotter the air, the more water vapor it can hold, but even at that, if the RH exceeds 100% then water will form.

How much water will depend on the RH of the air being ingested by the compressor, the heat being generated in the process, the temperature of the air in the tank, and the temperature in the air lines leading from the tank.

That's why you want to have compressed air filters at various points in an air circuit, to keep siphoning off the free water as it forms along the lines.

When you say the compression chamber, are you referring to the piston and cylinder?

B.

Dec 04, 2014
Clarification please
by: Dennis

Humidity is defined in one dictionary as: Wetness in the atmosphere. If this air is in an air compressor a 600 degrees and compresses enough say 600 psi will it turn into water in the compressor (the compression chamber itself), or is that what you was telling me.
Thank You
Dennis Daily
Va80232@gmail.com

Dec 03, 2014
Water in the air
by: Bill

Dennis, regardless of the temperature of the compressed air, if the relative humidity of that air exceeds 100%, then water will condense in the tank or air lines.

The hotter the air the more water vapor it is able to hold, yet condensation will still occur as the air expands heading into the tank.

As the air cools in the tank and air lines, more water will drop out.

I don't understand this... "I wouldn't know where to find an answer on your site..." If you look in the Compressor Issues navigation bar on the right, follow the link to compressor generated water for complete information. Or, use one of the many search boxes on the pages to find information relating to your search.

Compressed air filters will help in removing free water from the air lines.

Bill

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