Air cylinders as air storage?


(New Zealand )

Can we store air inside the Air Cylinder at high pressure and use the air that is stored inside to cool down a metal ?

_______________
Hello there...
There are a line of intensifier cylinders out there that are designed to use normal shop air pressures, say 90-120 PSI or so, and intensify the air pressure through internal plumbing to allow much great force out of the rod end.

I mention this as if the intensifier cylinder can handle the intensified air pressure, then yes, some cylinders can handle higher pressures.

The question not answered is what do you mean by high pressure, and another, how to you get the air out of the cylinder to flow over the metal to cool it.

It would be good to have more information about your application to better understand the needs, and another question, why use an air cylinder to store air?

Happy to help if I can. Sure could use more info as a comment here.

Cheers,

Bill

Click here to post comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Air Cylinder Information.

Speedaire Model 5YER3 pneumatic rotary actuator came without a manual.

by Bob Noechel
(Keyser, WV, USA)

5YER Grainger Speedaire Rotary Pneumatic table

5YER Grainger Speedaire Rotary Pneumatic table

Would it be possible to have a Speedaire Model 5YER3 pneumatic rotary actuator manual emailed to me?
____________________
Bob, I'd be pleased to if I had one.

Perhaps another visitor might have one, though the logical place to get it would be Grainger, as it is their product, and is currently still available from them.

Cheers,

Bill

Click here to post comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Air Cylinder Information.

air over oil

by Scott
(Perrinton, MI)

Dura-Tank Air Over Oil Tank (Photo: www.greencocylinders.com)

Dura-Tank Air Over Oil Tank (Photo: www.greencocylinders.com)

I built a new shop and installed a 20 foot hydraulic cylinder operated door. The only thing left to do is plumb the 4 inch cylinders. I would like to do the air over hydraulic method of actuation because of the low noise. My question to you is why does the tanks have to be higher than the cylinder ports? Siphon shouldn't be a problem or is it something else?
~Scott
________________
Hello Scott...
Good question.

You are correct, siphoning is not a problem, but air accumulation is.

As your air over oil system operates, minute amounts of air are ingested into the oil. Over time, this air can build up if it cannot dissipate naturally.

Air build up in the oil can cause erratic movement of the cylinder carriage or rod as the air is compressible.

Having the oil tanks higher than the cylinder, and having all lines higher than the cylinder being operated, will allow that air to bleed up and out of the top of the oil accumulator naturally.

Cheers,

Bill

Click here to post comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Air Cylinder Information.

a double acting air cylinder - is 15 HP enough?

by Tim
(Ontario)

I have a double acting air piston that consumes 10cfm per minute...by calculations. The operating pressure required is 150psi. 100 percent duty cycle is required. I have 15 hp available.

_________________
Hmmmm, Tim. I fail to see the question.

I'm guessing it is "is my compressor big enough"?

First question I guess is, is your air compressor rated for 150 PSI output?

Bill

Comments for a double acting air cylinder - is 15 HP enough?

Click here to add your own comments

Apr 05, 2011
Rephrase of question
by: Tim

Alright let me attempt to rephrase the question in an attempt to clarify things.
I have a system that utilizes a double acting pneamatic cylinder that requires 20 cfm per minute a planned operating pressure is 150psi. I have 15hp available to run a compressor.
So the question is a compound one, what size and type of compressor would be best suited for my air requirements? Second part as to weather or not 15 hp is enough to run the compressor required.

____________________

Rule of thumb is you'll get about 4 CFM of compressed air at 90 PSI for each HP of motor. I don't have a formula to figure out what that flow would be per horsepower at 150 PSI, but you can be sure it will be quite a bit less than 4 CFM, but might be enough to run your cylinder.

In terms of type of compressor, the decision making has to include your budget, who sells them near where you are, more importantly, who services them where you are, what the duty cycle is, and and what type will give you the 150 PSI output required, reliably. I cannot answer these questions sitting at my desk here in a rural part of the country.

My gut feel is a small rotary screw, one with more than the 150 PSI at 20 CFM required, to give you a margin of safety.

Cheers,

B.


Click here to add your own comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Air Cylinder Information.