I want to use a scuba air tank (3000psi) to run airtools. I have a scuba compressor and live on a boat.

by Brian
(Coastal Australia)

I want to use a scuba air tank (3000psi) to run airtools. I have a scuba compressor and live on a boat.


What regulator to use?
What valve?
Connections?
__________________
Your air tools don't much care where the air they run on comes from, as long as the flow is adequate and the pressure is within their operating range.

Can you run air tools with air from a scuba tank? I don't see why not, though that would have to get expensive over time.

Brian, I have no experience with scuba or high pressure air so I cannot recommend a regulator or parts.

The regulator(s) you use will have to allow sufficient flow for the air tools of choice, which is, I expect, much greater than that demanded of a breathing regulator.

You need to talk to the regulator companies directly, to find out what range of regulators you will need.

As to plumbing, once you get down to 100 PSI or so, any brass fittings, industrial air quality poly tube or rubber air line hose, etc. will work fine.

It's the getting from a low flow 3000# air supply into a low pressure high volume flow that I can't comment on.

Anyone else have experience with this?

Bill

Comments for I want to use a scuba air tank (3000psi) to run airtools. I have a scuba compressor and live on a boat.

Click here to add your own comments

Aug 01, 2013
high pressure regulator
by: doug s.d.ca

Norgren 11-010
3000 in 175 max out.
Used for transportable soda dispensers.

Jul 23, 2013
SCUBA compressed air source
by: Steve Hericks

I use exactly this setup and sell them to friends.

What I do is buy an older scuba regulator that a diver might be reluctant to trust his life to and modify it.

A SCUBA first stage regulator outputs 140PSI. I first strip all the hoses off of it and leave 1 HP and 2 LP ports open. The HP port is 7/16-20 thread and usually so is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). If the SPG is in good condition, I remove the SPG from the hose and threaded directly into the valve. Sometimes it has a permanently attached small stem with o-ring to seal to the HP hose. Cut the stem off with a hack saw add add an o-ring to the gauge stem.

Sometimes I throw the gauge away and put a new liquid filled non-SPG gauge on it. 5000psi Liquid filled 2-1/2" gauge with a 7/16-20TPI(M) stem are not uncommon. They have the benefit of having an adjustable lock nut so when you thread the gauge fully and align the gauge, then lock it in the position where you want to read it.

In one LP port (3/8-24TPI)I put a pressure relief valve in case the regulator freezes, I don't want HP going to my tool. Its set at about 200-220 pop-off. (its standard gear on dry suit rigs.

In the second LP port, I add a 1/4MPT x 3/8-24TPI(M) adapter onto which I add a standard air quick coupler (1/4FPT).

That's it.

Provides 140PSI air perfectly.

When I want lower pressure, I have a standard low pressure regulator with a male quick coupler on the input and a female on the outlet I can just stack onto the first stage regulator.

I typically sell these for $80 for those which are older and with a SPG and $100 for those which are newer and have a new gauge.

I could sell the gauge, relief valve and MPT adapter for about $50 if you want to provide your own regulator. I use these setups for an air source for pneumatic cannon (t-shirt launchers).

Click here to add your own comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Compressed Air Regulator Questions.

Air Pressure Regulator Valve

If someone turns the Air Pressure down to 0 on the air regulator valve, will that cause the air pressure to build up enough to cause
air to damage and flow out of the guage?
__________________
By turning the pressure setting on the compressor regulator down to zero, on many compressors, that will shut off the flow downstream from the regulator.

The regulator has no control over the air pressure upstream from itself, that's controlled by the pressure switch.

If the regulator was set for 100 PSI for example, and the compressor tank was full, then the air in the line downstream from the regulator would be full of 100 PSI compressed air.

Most general purpose air regulators are relieving, meaning that when the pressure setting on the regulator is lowered, the regulator will allow air to bleed back out through itself to atmosphere.

If, however, you dial the regulator down to zero PSI, and air continues to flow out the relief hole (maybe near the gauge) and the tank pressure starts to drop, then the regulator may have failed.

Bill

Click here to post comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Compressed Air Regulator Questions.

why would the pressure drop on the gage AFTER the compressor kicks on?

by Julie Knight
(Batchelor, LA)

We have a water well with an air compressor that looses pressure when it kicks on. it will drop below 40. When it is off the pressure will rise back to only 40. What can I check?
________________
Julie, I'd like to help but I have no idea how your air compressor works with your well. What pressure drops when the air compressor kicks on? Where is the gauge you are watching when the pressure drops? If the pressure drop is in the water pressure tank... that's out of my league. Sorry.

Bill

Click here to post comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Compressed Air Regulator Questions.

Air regulator problem - releases air?

by carl
(philippines)

first of all, thanks for answering my last question, and i fix the problem, thanks again. for now i have one problem about the air regulator. it suddenly releases air every time i decreases the air, i think under 30 psi the air releases. my air regulator is commonly seen in portable airbrush compressor. Thanks :)
_____________
Hi Carl...

When you say "it suddenly releases air every time i decreases the air" I am understanding that as you dial the regulator pressure down, the regulator hisses off air pressure. Is that correct?

Relax. That's normal. You seen, when you have your air regulator set, for example, 100 PSI, and you decide to dial it down to 50 PSI, you new have 100 PSI in the line downstream from the regulator, even though you want 50 PSI.

The regulator "reads" the downstream pressure, and if that downstream pressure is higher than the pressure point set on the regulator, it "relieves" it to atmosphere.

Have a look at the regulators page for complete details of your compressor regulator function.

Any more questions about your regulator? Just add a comment here.

Cheers,

Bill

Click here to post comments

Add your own question or comment. It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Compressed Air Regulator Questions.