Plumbing size of air Compressor discharge port

by Yankeeflyboy
(Nevada)

I recently purchased a 60 gal stationary compressor. I plan to run 3/4" copper lines throughout my shop. The discharge port on the compressor is 3/8" in a large reducing bushing, apparently 2". Would it be advisible to replace this bushing with a 2" to 3/4" or just to use an adaptor to increase from 3/8" to 3/4"? It just seems strange that the port is so small.

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I would use the 2" to 3/4" reducer bushing to remove the flow restriction caused by the 3/8".

I suspect that the 3/8" port can flow all the air the compressor can generate, but why reduce the flow and then plumb back up to a larger pipe? Go with the 3/4". I can't hurt, for sure.

Bill

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Presseure drop off

by Lenny Foderaro
(Hope Mills, North Carolina)

Sir

I have a very basic air line setup of black pipe.

My compressor is a 4hp 80gallong I come out of the side of my compressor to a cut off valve into a flex hose.

from there the flex hose goes into a coupler into a 3\8 to 1\2 90 degree elbow to 4' of 1\2 black pipe through a 90 degree 1\2 elbow then trough 10' x 1\2 black pipe then through a 1\2 x 3\8 reducer through a 3\8 x 2" spacer pipe into my regulator\oiler (CH PA2078)

out from there to another 3\8 x 2" spacer to a 3\8 elbow into a air hose coupler.

The issue is I am not able to maintain a constant 90PSI to my air tools. If I connect my air tools to the coupler coming off the compressor regulated side at 90PSI's no problem.

Any idea on what I'm missing? I have replaced my regulator\oiler thinking that was the issue but it continues. I am totally at a lose and would greatly appreciate any assistance your experience can provide, thank you.

Lenny
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Lenny, please see the pages on pressure drop linked from the site map. I think you are starving your tools by having too many pressure-reducing issues in your air line.

Cheers,

Bill

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compressor can't keep up with air tool - big enough compressor

by Bob
(Tennessee)

I have a 6.5 sears 90 gallon 160 max psi vertical compressor I have a spit line with both regulators set to 90 psi.The problem occurs on both lines.The problem I am having is when I use a 4.5 cfm angle grinder the pressure drops down to a point after about 4-5 minutes that the tool barely operates. I would think a compressor of this size should be capable of running this tool fairly effortlessly.
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Bob, if the compressor is 6.5 HP, then yes, since it should give you around 26 CFM of compressed air at 90 PSI, I would agree that it should drive an air tool that uses 4.5 CFM.

Clearly, then, something is interfering with the flow of sufficient air from the tank.

Since I don't know how long the air lines are, or the size of them, I cannot suggest that this might be the issue.

If it is a common feed from the tank to a splitter, and then each line from the splitter is plumbed through it's own regulator, and you experience the problem on both lines, I would think that it is not the regulator at fault, unless both are undersized for the flow.

If the regulators are OK, then it's got to be the splitter or else something else is slowing flow.

I suggest you plumb right from the tank nipple, a direct air hose, right to the tool, and run the tool for a bit to see if that resolves the issue. If it does, then start adding components back into the circuit until you hit the one where the problem starts.

Cheers,

Bill



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