Auto refilling of lubricators

by Billy
(Memphis, TN USA)

I want to automatically refill multiple pneumatic lubricators on an assembly. who has the equipment and how is it done?

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Billy, that's a great question.

Over the years I've seen, and installed, equipment to automatically lubricate bearings and such, but have not run into equipment to auto fill multiple lubricators at the same time.

You would need some sort of injector fitting to get lubricating oil into a lubricator that is charged with compressed air against the air pressure.

Master Pneumatic has injectors but not in the volume that you would need. Yet, they are experts in the field, so why not contact them?

http://www.masterpneumatic.com/

You will want to know how many lubricators you want to fill, the capacity for each, and I would suspect some sort of idea how often.

I would appreciate some feedback for others if you are able to come up with solutions.

And, of course, if any other visitor has suggestions, please add them as comments here.

Cheers,

Bill

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How to set up and operate an air line lubricator?

by Steve
(Palm Desert, Ca USA)

Filter, regulator and lubricator - air treatment for manufacturing equipment

Filter, regulator and lubricator - air treatment for manufacturing equipment

Filter, regulator and lubricator - air treatment for manufacturing equipment
Filter, regulator and lubricator - air treatment for manufacturing equipment
Filter, regulator and lubricator - air treatment for manufacturing equipment

Hi,

I received a printing machine that has an air filter/ lubricator on the side of the machine. The manual says to put oil in it, but it doesn't say how or where or what kind of oil.

I have attached 3 pictures showing the unit. One piece is marked AFR-2000 on it and the other is marked AL- 2000

All I can tell is there is a rotating dial on the top of the unit and a flat head screw. I have no idea what either of these do, nor do I know how to put oil in the glass container, and how much to put in.

Thanks for any help.

Steve
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Steve, thanks for uploading photos. That makes your question and responses more helpful for all.

Make sure that the air supply to the machine is gone; turned off and vented to atmosphere.

I suspect that the flat head screw is either a fill port, or the flow adjustment for the lubricator. By carefully backing out that screw - if it is captured, that is, will not come out, then it is likely the flow adjustment. If it comes out and you can see clearly down into the bowl, then it it probably a fill access.

If so, you can use this to fill the bowl or, at this point you should be able to unscrew the bowl of the lubricator fairly easily by turning the bowl counter-clockwise.

Regardless of how you do so, fill the bowl with the appropriate lubricating oil (whatever air components you are lubricating will have lube specifications ) and screw the bowl back into the head of the lubricator or put the flat head screw back in.

The "bubble" on top of your lubricator is a sight glass enabling you to see, while compressed air is flowing through the lubricator, how much oil is being pulled into the air stream by the passing air. There should be a drop of oil coming out of the pitot tube every 2-3 minutes at most, again though, depending on the cycle speed of the components being lubricated.

Make sure that the air flow to the machine enters the Filter/Regulator first, then to the lubricator, and then to the machine components.

See the lubricator page on this site for additional info.

Bill

Comments for How to set up and operate an air line lubricator?

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Jan 26, 2013
Air Line Lubricator
by: Steve

Hi Again Bill,

Thanks for the initial information. I was able to remove the screw and it had a "O' ring at the top so I am assuming that is a "fill port". I have a question about that "sight glass" at the top. I read where you are supposed to watch the oil mix with air, but I would have a real hard time monitoring that. The encloed pictures show where they mounted on the unit. It is in a very bad spot to routinely "watch" it. Plus there is a dial on top with the numbers (0-9)but absolutely no way of telling what it's set on(there is no markings as to an actual set point). If you try and rotate the dial counter-clockwise it eventually stops. But I have no idea whether that is "0" or "9". So obviously I am unclear as to how much oil I would be delvering in the air line.

Steve
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If the lubricator is unusable due to age, missing indicator marks etc., then the best thing to do is replace it with a new one.

Any full size lubricator with the same port size as the old one can be used. They new one will come with instructions. That may be your best bet.

I don't know what equipment on your machine is being lubricated. If the equipment being lubricated is valves and cylinders, and they are new, unless the cycle rate is quite high, they may not need lubrication since often valves and cylinders now are delivered "lubed for life".

Norgren, Numatics, Master Pneumatic, SMC, Festo all offer air line lubricators.

Also, read the section completely on lubricators, in particular, where it talks about distance from lubricator to the point being lubricated.

B.

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