setting up air lines in shop

by sebastien guilmrad
(DC)

Hi, Love your site. Really nice.


I just picked up two 135psi compressors that I plan on using together to build a reliable system for my garage. One is a 120v on castors so it can be moved around. the other is stationary (60gal). I was reading up on how to set up lines to allow for additional condensing of water, sloping lines, etc.

Did you have information or a write up on this?

I noticed that some people prefer to go up from the trunk line, then go back down at each drop, going past the outlet and terminating with a valve and drain. Others use a simple t and go straight down. Any advice?

Seems like doing a complete loop is the best though and sloping the main away from the compressors.


Thank you.
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Sebastien, all my recommendations for compressor plumbing, adding another compressor etc. are found on the pages of this site and are available at no cost to the viewer.

If you want to fast-track your work and not use your time to review all the info that is free for your use here, then contact me through the contact page and I'll tell you my rates for a private report and recommendations.

Thanks for your positive comments.

Cheers,

Bill

Comments for setting up air lines in shop

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Nov 23, 2013
line drop
by: Doug in s.d.ca

This reminds me of a comment here (somewhere...) asking why not slope the line back toward the compressor.

If the line is really large, that might be a plan. But one reason not to is that the air is blowing away from the compressor, so it is probably usually better to have any water going the same way, rather than tending to blow it back where it drained from.

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Air hose connections to a compressor.

by Ron Powrozek
(Bridgeport, MI USA)

I bought a 1.5 gal compressor from Sears and want to connect a longer (non-spiral) hose to it. First of all do interconnect hoses normally have female connectors at both ends. If so, that mean that I need a male mating connector on the nailer/stapler (which it has) and also a male mating connector on the tank. If my assumptions are correct so far, my next question is, do I need a male connector at the tank that will hold air (check valve) until a connestion is made? You said there were no stupid questions!

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Bill says....

Correct Ron. There are no stupid questions, and yours are commonly asked.

To answer them fully, I added pages to this site on COUPLERS and CONNECTORS which should answer all the questions you asked.

For complete info, visit those pages, linked from the site map.

For air systems, couplers are typically checked.

Cheers,

Bill

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Piping Gradient - slope the piping upwards, away from the compressor

The conventional wisdom is to design an initial piping length that slopes downwards, away from the compressor, for some 20' to a drain point.

My question: with the water condensing out and flowing down, away from the compressor to the drain point thus being ever more concentrated approaching that drain point would (some of( it not be reabsorbed by the air stream (albeit it has cooled somewhat earlier in the pipe)?

If so, would it not make more sense to slope the piping upwards, away from the compressor so that the water flows back down (to a drain near the compressor) and with an increasingly dryer state in the piping the further away form the compressor (an drain point) so that at (say) 20' there is no (more) moisture to be reabsorbed?
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Interesting thought. It flies in the face of common compressed air plumbing wisdon.

I suspect that in some cases this might work, but in larger ring mains, having that water travel all the way back to the compressor would simply create more surface area of moisture to be re-entrained as the compressed air passed over it to the point of use.

Might work OK in a 20' run, doubt it would work in a 200' run with multiple drops to work stations.

Cheers,

Bill

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How to connect more than one line or tool

Hello,

I'm trying to figure out how to connect more than one line or tool to my compressor. I'm looking to purchase a rather large rotary compressor, it has one 3/4 inch opening. Now I know how to reduce that down to a 1/4 inch npt opening. But what would be the best way to connect 7 to 10 air tools to this single compressor. I have made sure of the calculations and I have more than enough CFM, I have about 55, when my required is 45.

I just want to know how to connect all these small tools that will be used simultaneously, to one large compressor.

Bhaarat.patel@sachigroup.net
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Bhaarat, assuming that they are not going to be used all at the exact same location, then typically one would take a drop line off a ceiling main, through and FR and maybe L to the air tool.

I would not reduce the line coming from the compressor out to the shop. Rather, I would reduce the drop size somewhat so that you have the largest comfortable size of air line getting to your air tools to maintain the flow for optimum operation.

You really do need to read the pages on this site about plumbing, installation, location etc. All the compressed air plumbing information you want is already on those pages.

Bill

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Jan 29, 2014
multiple tools
by: Doug in s.d.ca

What Bill said -

You'll want to consider whether cost is problem, and how and where the tools will be used,

For example, a portable at a job site; you may want two or three outlets right at the compressor, which you would connect to large hoses running to a smaller manifolds with more (and smaller) hoses from there, to allow for mobility of the tools.
You'd probably want to use quick connects on all the hoses.

You really want to think about this before you waste money and time doing something unsuitable.

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