We have Quincy compressor showing dewpoint fault and air is blowing out of the "water" valve

The Quincy compressor registered a "dewpoint fault" and air is blowing out of the "water" valve. Please advise.

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OK, I know what dewpoint is, but I'm hanged if I know how your compressor is registering a "dewpoint fault", and I'm not quite sure what you mean by a "water valve".

I would very much like to offer a suggestion, but I'm afraid I just don't understand.

Maybe you could send in a digital photo of where the problem is occurring?

Sorry,

Bill

Comments for We have Quincy compressor showing dewpoint fault and air is blowing out of the "water" valve

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Apr 02, 2011
air dryer...
by: Mike

Dewpoint - Sounds like your compressor has an integrated refrigerated air dryer. If you have a dewpoint fault check the following: Does the dryer fan turn freely by hand? If not, replace. Check the control fuses in the dryer circuit. If any are blown, replace. Also check the pressure switch in the dryer. It may have a manual reset button on it, if so press it. If you still have a problem call a refrigeration tech. You might have lost freon or refrigeration compressor has failed. Always keep your dryer condenser free from dirt. Blow it out once a week.
'Water" valve - Your dryer has either a float type drain or a timed solenoid drain that removes water from the dryer. Your drain is stuck in the open position. Either open it up and clean it or replace it.

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Quincy model 230 ROC 32 with corroded tank

by Gregg Wallace
(North Carolina)

I have a Quincy 230 ROC 32 compressor that was given to me about 15 years ago. I used it very little at the time. I finished off my upstairs about five years ago and set it out side of my house to have air for tools used in this project.

However I neglected to get it back out of the weather and it has been sitting there that long.

I used it for pumping up air tanks and tires and things of that nature. I have now built a shop and want to put it to full use. The compressor obviously needs some tlc after this much neglect. I need to know where to start and what I should do to ensure this unit is safe and reliable. There is quite a bit of surface rust on the tank. Should I have it hydro tested or just replace it. Should I buy a rebuild kit or just service it. I know I should be ashamed for the treatment of this machine but whats done is done. Any suggestions please. Gregg

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Bill says...

It were me with this compressor I'd clean it up, change the oil, and put it to work. If it worked... wonderful. If it didn't, depending on what the failure was, I'd fix it or replace it.

If the tank corrosion is widespread, I would replace the tank, if it were me. Normally, a metal tank will rust in a spot or two and eventually a hole may develop. That shouldn't be a catastrophic failure, just a leak. You fix the leak or replace the tank.

If the tank is badly and widely corroded, my thought it that this might be a recipe for a major tank failure, and if that happens, you might get bits of tank flying around.

Might cost you as much to test the tank as to buy a new one?

Cheers,

Bill

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