Recently inherited what appears to be a 1978 Sears/DeVilbiss/Doerr air compressor.

by J.W. Wooten
(Bulverde, Texas US)

The pump, a vertical, apparently single cylinder type is mounted on what appears to be a 15 to 20 gallon horizontal tank.


After visiting several DeVilbiss websites, I determined that in the location they give for the Model number of the pump, there is no stamp nor any plate. There is a smooth area there, at the base of the pump on the side away from the pulley, as though a Model Stamp could have been put there, but there is not one.

There is no Model number anywhere around the base of the pump where the pump mounts to the plate on top of the tank.

The tank itself has a chrome metal plate with the following information stamped on it. -

DeVilbiss, 150 psi @ 350 degrees F, max temp and pressure.

MFGS No. 000082101978.

On the opposite end of the tank from the pump, there is an electric motor with a Doerr name plate and the following: -
2 HP, 3450 RPM, 230 Volts, Motor Ref. R604935H783.

There is a plastic belt and pully shroud which has a faded sears name.

The compressor runs good (we initially had an air leakage problem with the pressure regulator, but by simply adjusting it, the unit will kick off at 125 lbs and keep me at an operating pressure above 100 lbs.

I am remodeling an old farmhouse (alone) so I don't make exceptional demand of the unit.

My problem stems from the drive belt which is extremely frayed and just about to part. It is an unusual belt and the pulleys on the compressor and motor are likewise unique (at least to me). The belt is 49 1/2" long and 1/2" wide. It is flat on the back with grooves and ridges rather than a V or double V shape. There are five grooves and six ridges that mesh into five grooves and six ridges on the pump and motor pulleys.

The pulleys are flat faced as well except for these grooves and corresponding ridges.

The color paint scheme of the tank, pump and motor is black. I suppose it is possible that I could simply exchange the pump and motor pulleys for conventional "V" shapes and purchase a corresponding belt. However, I'd first like to see if I can find a replacement belt. Any information or help will be greatly appreciated.

Comments for Recently inherited what appears to be a 1978 Sears/DeVilbiss/Doerr air compressor.

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Feb 10, 2016
Belt type
by: Woodworker

Sir: I looks to me like you have a serpentine belt on your compressor. Just like the ones on the newer cars and trucks. But they are usually about 1 inch wide. I have an old sears paint compressor and it has the same belt. Not sure of the length. I know most auto parts stores sell the replacement belts for cars and trucks, I'd check there first.
Good luck
Larry

Aug 30, 2014
grooved belt source
by: Anonymous

grainger has several of the grooved belts.

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What year is this unknown compressor?

by Neil
(Langley BC Canada)





I have just purchased this little air compressor and I am trying to find any information on age. Thanks

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Help identify - Mystery Lead off Leyland Compressor

by Peter
(Sheffield UK)



Hello All,

We are abit stuck - we have a railway locomotive powered by a Perkins 104.19 diesel engine.

To provide air for the train, we have a Leyland Compressor 02301 as seen in attached photo, which is attached via two rubber couplings on a drive shaft

However we have been unable to identify the lead (circled in red) that is on the side of the compressor and where this fits on the engine.

Any ideas what it might be. Oil Feed?!

Also whilst operating it, from the Unloader Valve as seen in photo 2, there was a yellowly liquid dripping from it... is this usual?!

Any help appreciated

Peter

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Unidentifed vintage Kellogg american break shoe small air compressor

by Scott Hineman
(Enterprise WV)


Hi I am so glad I found ur page. I have been looking for a month for information on this small air compressor. I picked it up at a swap meet about a month ago. It is 14 1/2" long by 7 " wide and about 10" tall. The name plate says Kellogg division American break shoe company Rochester NY the model number is unreable and the serial is 165431. It has a GE 1/3 hp 1725 rmp motor. My father in law lives in Rochester and this would look great in his garage, but I would like to know exactly I am giving him.

Any help at all would be greatly appreciated Thank you
Scott Hineman Enterprise WV

PS it does have 4 rubber feet on base

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Aug 31, 2014
Diaphragm compresor
by: Anonymous

Looks like a disphragm type compressor. There is usually a large rubber diaphragm that goes up and down that acts like a piston. It is permanently attached to the connecting rod. All lubrication is contained in the bottom end, so the air coming out is oil free. Sometimes referred to as a wobble piston compressor. Not really a high pressure rig, but I don't have the specs for it.

Neat machine.

Nov 02, 2013
need iom or info on this compressor
by: Kerrie

I recently bought this compressor on ebay and I'm looking for any info or IOM on it. I can see a 8 and a C in the model number but there has to be more numbers. Any help or info would be greatly appreciated.
_________________
Kerrie, start a new thread and upload pictures. That always helps.

B.

Aug 09, 2013
Kellog - American Brake Shoe compressor
by: Doug in s.d.ca

Anything to see from the back side, plumbing?

What's the white/orange label say?

Have you looked at the Mahwah museum stuff?

What do you make of the horizontal element coming off the cylinder head?

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