duty cycle and cfm

A DK5100 Kreg pocket hole 5 drill requires 20 cfm at 50% duty cyle. Could a 18.1 cfm with 65% duty cycle work? If not, why please?

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Hi there...

There is no way to equate air compressor duty cycle to the CFM requirements of a particular air tool.

The duty cycle has to do with how long the air compressor can run before taking a break to cool down.

The CFM rating is how much air the air compressor can output at a certain pressure.

If you could take a moment to read the Duty Cycle and Compressor Sizing pages on this site, you would better see this.

Any other questions?

Cheers,

Bill


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I'm trying to achieve 23 to 25 SCFM @90

by isiah webster
(San Diego, CA)

Honda gas powered motor (Photo: www.engines.honda.com)

Honda gas powered motor (Photo: www.engines.honda.com)

Hi bill...
I have a 13 hp gx honda motor and a curtis 8 gallon twin tanks, single speed 3 cyl. pump (125 psi) I'm trying to achieve 23 to 25 SCFM @90
can this be done. Would I have to upgrade to a 2 stage pump and a larger tank possible twin 10's lol or add a 30 gallon tank.
I'm looking to run automotive tools, out of my van, it has to be portable.
axel nut's lugs, assisting on off bolts. not constance use.
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Howdy Isiah...

Typically, a 13 HP motor combined with a compressor pump of the correct size should be able to deliver 40-50 CFM of compressed air at 90 PSI.

The thing is, I have no idea what "single speed 3 cyl. pump (125 psi)" is designed to deliver nor do I know if it is built to handle a 13 HP motor.

When you have an air compressor that can output more compressed air than your air tool needs, the tank size becomes immaterial. The tanks purpose then is to capture compressed air from the pump up to the pressure level that the pressure switch needs to see to shut the compressor off. That is it's purpose. Without the tank and the pressure switch, your compressor would keep running, at least, your typical reciprocating air compressor runs this way.

Adding a larger tank means that when you fire up your air tool you have more pre-compressed air ready to go before the compressor has to start to rebuild the air pressure.

Once the compressor starts, if its output exceeds the demand of the air tool, the tank may still fill and shut down the compressor, particularly if the tool isn't using air faster than the compressor can build it.

If you are not sure, a bigger tank is always better than a smaller one, as long as your pump is overworked to fill it.

Without knowing the discharge capacity of your pump, I cannot tell you if the output will be sufficient for the 23 to 25 CFM you want, even though your motor HP is sufficiently powerful enough to drive a pump big enough to do that.

Cheers,

Bill

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Moving compressed air 10,000 FT!

by Sean
(WV)

If you were trying to get the air from the compressor to an air pump that is 10,000 ft away, how would you do it?

It is not as simple as moving the air compressor as that is not possible.

The other variables are that on the way you will have to deliver air to several other pumps.

Taking into account friction I have looked at 4" hose for the first 4500ish ft, then to a 3" hose for the next 2500ft and then 2.5 the rest of the way. This puts the cost up to about $170000.

Do you know of any other options for moving the air?

The psi rating only has to be at 100. The cfm is going to be 600 at the start and then step down per pump till the last run only has to run 300. Thanks for any input you may be able to throw my way!
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Sean, the numbers are boggling. You say only 100 PSI at the end, but that's huge when you consider how far you have to send the air.

And then you say you need 300 CFM at the end of the run?

You want to flow air from one compressor almost 2 miles and have 100 PSI and 300 CFM at the end?

I offer general information on pressure drop on that page.

You need an air engineer to help you determine if you can generate the flows with the pipe sizes you indicate. Personally, I doubt it.

Any chance of building huge air reservoirs along the length where you need the flow. That might be one option... but again, you need engineering help.

I hope one reads this and adds some suggestions for you.

Cheers,

Bill


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3 gal. 100psi compressor, will it pump up to 90 lbs?

by Ron
(Altoona,Pa.)

I recently bought a 3 gal 100 psi compressor. I had to put on 2 new tires and tubes on my bicycle. Each tire calls for 90 lbs pressure. It seems like I can only get about 45 lbs. in each tire.

Now I will admit that I am a little scared to try to put in 90 lbs in each tire but the compressor seems to stop pushing at around 45 lbs.

So I quit trying to put air into them. Am I being to cautious or is it only cable of putting this much air into these?

AS ALWAYS YOUR ANSWER IS APPRECIATED

RON
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Hi there Ron.

I cannot comment on the pressure capacity of your tires. The sidewall should have an imprint that tells you what capacity the tires have. Use that as a guide.

If your air compressor is new, and it's rated for 100 PSI, then there is no reason why it cannot supply your air tires with 90 PSI... except, if it is not working properly or the regulator setting is too low.

See the pages on air regulators for information on what they are and how they work, and then comment here if that is not the issue, OK?

Bill

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