Compression Fitting Size

Threaded air outlet on air compressor pump

Threaded air outlet on air compressor pump

Compressor Pump Only

Speedaire/Granger Part: 5Z405

The outlet is at a Tee. the pipe going into it is 3/4" O.D. What is the fitting that I can use to attach to this outlet. It is a compression fitting but I can't figure out what to use. I have attached a pic of the outlet. Any info will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
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Thanks for including the photo. When I increase the screen image size it stays clear and I can see the threads.

What I don't know is what this line is for. You say " the pipe going into it is 3/4" O.D.". Was it or is it the line from the pump to the tank?

I would like to know what was/is normally threaded on to this male thread to be sure.

However, a quick fix is to visit the plumbing store in the brass fittings section and buy a female / female bushing that fits this thread. Then you can thread a male fitting of any size needed with reducers into the other.

Bill

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NPT I/M

by Jerry
(Paramus, NJ)

what is the difference between a 1/4 NPT and an 1/4 NPT I/M fitting and are they inter changeable?
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Hi Jerry...

I do not recognize the I/M portion of the thread name. NPT is, of course, national pipe taper.

Knowing where you found the name might help.

I could guess that I/M might stand for imperial / metric, which would suggest that it is a thread designed to be used in both imperial and metric ports.

When you measure the O.D. of the thread, is it the same for both?

If so, then the next step is to thread both into a 1/4 port and see how many threads penetrate before they cannot be threaded further. If they penetrate 4+ threads, then that would suggest that they are useful in both metric and imperial port sizes.

Anyone else from the wider pneumatic community an offer advice here?

Thanks,

Bill

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Aug 15, 2014
I/M couplers
by: Doug in s.d.ca

NPT is NPT, and refers to the threaded end.

"I/M style" (apparently) refers to "Industrial / Milton", meaning the garden variety of couplers that usually come with DIY compressors.

The bump near the tip of the male I/M connector is narrow, about a 16th inch at the outside diameter.

The bump on a "T" connector (Tru-Flate) is mostly used in automotive shops, and has about an 8th inch wide flat at the end.

There are "I/M", "T" and 'universal' "U" female checked couplers. The "U" connectors work with either "I/M" or "T" males, but are not truely universal.

All are commonly sold at big-box stores.

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Adding second coupling?

by rick
(ny)

Compressed air manifold

Compressed air manifold

Hi
I recently purchased the portable emglo dual stack tank air compressor. In the product description it says it can run two framing nailers as well as other multiple nailers at once however there is only one coupler on the compressor. I bought what I needed to add a second coupler but after reading the owners manual it states not to add another coupler directly off the tank where the original one is. My question is what will the harm be of doing this and what are my other options of adding a second coupler to my unit?
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Hi Rick...

I have no idea why Emglo says not to add another coupler to the existing coupler. Makes no sense to me.

Maybe they are concerned that someone may add a non-checked coupler which would be like leaving a fitting wide open to atmosphere. Or, it could be their couplers are proprietary, and if you add a coupler from another source, the connector may not fit both?

In your shoes I would find a manifold with a female thread on the left end, like my rather crude drawing. I would, after emptying the tank and shutting down the compressor, remove the existing discharge coupler, and thread the manifold on the nipple where the coupler used to be.

I would ensure that the manifold had plugs in any ports that I was not using. I would thread as many couplers into the manifold that I needed or the manifold could accommodate, and voila, places to plug connectors in from a variety of air lines.

Make sure all couplers will work with the same connector, and make sure all couplers are checked so they don't leak.

I cannot tell you to disregard the manual for your compressor. If it were my air compressor and I needed additional outlets, I would.

Don't be surprised if the air compressor cannot keep up with production nailing. It might, since nailers use shots of air instead of a steady stream, but if you have skilled operators on the framing nailers and both are working at the same time, you might have an air supply problem.

Cheers,

Bill

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Aug 21, 2013
direct addition of second coupler
by: doug s.d.ca

My thought is the mfr is concerned about excess mechanical load on their output pipe.

Were I concerned about it, I'd probably go with a leader hose (3 ft or so) to whatever manifold or other plumbing I needed.

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brass compression fitting on exhaust manifold for a 3/4 inch copper tube

by russ
(oregon)

I can't find one that fits. The threads seem to be metric and I can't find one. Exhaust manifold part # RE102E
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While in terms of the specifications for a specific air compressor that info helps, really, reading the fitting section on this site should provide all the information you need to help you find the fitting that suits your air compressor.

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Aug 14, 2014
Fitting connection
by: Bill

The problem with a typed account is that you know what you are referring to, but I am not sure.

What I suggest you do is start a new thread so that you can upload a few photos of the area of the compressor you are referring to.

Include:

-compressor make
-compressor model
-from where does the not included tube connect, and where would it connect to if you had it
-is the connect point you are referring to at the tank where the tank check valve is

With a bit more info, perhaps we can help.

Cheers,

Bill

Aug 14, 2014
Output fitting of v-twin compressor pump
by: Anonymous

I just purchased a 5 hp v-twin pump and the output fitting (which normally is routed to the tank)appears to be a real oddball.

It comes supposedly ready to accept a 3/4" od tube but it's not a normal compression fitting.

The tube (not supplied) with ferrule (supplied) doesn't seem to be able to enter the fitting beyond the point where the ferrule ends--- so the ferrule will naturally not grip the back end of the tubing at all.

Assembling and tightening of the fitting would not allow any of the tube to show (when disassembled).

Any normal fitting allows the tube to pass beyond the ferrule's inner end at least an eighth of an inch or (usually) more.

I cannot see how any normal mechanic could make this connection.

It's obviously supposed to accept a 3/4" tube using the supplied sleeve (ferrule) and nut but who has ever seen a fitting like this and how on Earth does it go together???

Feb 23, 2014
tube
by: Doug in s.d.ca

Looks military, so may be metric.

There seems to be a flange/tube associated with it, so maybe that's what you need.

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