SCFM requirement for my air stapler

SCFM requirement for my air stapler


I purchased a CH 1.3 running HP / 8 gallon air compressor. I also purchased a flooring stapler that says it needs SCFM requirement of 6.36 CFM@ 90 psi as minimum standard.

Will the flooring stapler work at 6.36 CFM @ 90 psi with a CH 1.3 running HP / 8 gallon air compressor or do I need to return the flooring stapler?
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Howdy 'Mach04':

Will your compressor run your stapler? Yes, it will.

Will your compressor run it well enough for you to move quickly on your floor installation? No, it likely won't.

Somewhere in your compressor information (manual / spec sheet / label) it will tell you what air flow your 1.8 running HP will generate at certain air pressures. I'm going to guess that it is about 5 CFM @ 90 PSI, and maybe twice that at 40 PSI.

Your 8 gallon air tank will hold likely in the area of 150 PSI of air, depending on what your cut-out pressure is on your compressor pressure switch, and what it is designed to do. So, you will have a bit of leeway there, as you will set your downstream air pressure to the 90 PSI that your stapler needs, and your supply will be at (briefly) 150 PSI.

The bottom line is that if you aren't in a hurry, then you can take a few shots with the stapler, this will draw down the available air pressure to below your minimum operating pressure for the stapler, and then you wait until the air pressure in the tank catches up.

If you are putting floors in for a living, then you can't afford to wait for air pressure, and you will need a bigger compressor.

I reiterate: Will your compressor run your stapler? Yes, it will. Will the compressor run it fast enough for you? That's up to you to decide.

Complete details of compressor size, wiring, how the compressor is limited by voltage etc. are found in my ebook The Home Compressor. Might be an idea for you to get a copy.

Cheers,

Bill

Comments for SCFM requirement for my air stapler

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Mar 25, 2009
New comment
by: Bill

Paul: you wrote:

Hi Bill

There is no new comment from you at the link below.

Could you please resend it.

thanks

paul

Mar 25, 2009
funny -- to Bill from Ottawa
by: mach4

I thought you might be from down south in Texas or somewhere near there.

Funny, your just up the rideau from me as I'm in Kingston.

Paul

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Howdy neighbor! :-)

~B.

Mar 25, 2009
responding to Bill
by: mach4

Hi Bill

Thank you for your quick response.

I'm a slow meticulous, rookie when doing upgrades around my house. I usually only to projects during the summer holidays. Took me 2 summers to finish my two level deck.

To summarize it would seem that my 8 gallon air compressor and flooring stapler will work fine to do the living this summer as I am a slow worker.

I was concerned because the Campbell Hausfeld 1.3 HP 8 gallon works only at 3.7 SCFM @ 90 PSi and the flooring stapler requires 6.36 CFM @ 90PSi. These numbers seem to indicate a larger discrepancy. The CH air comp came with a 1/2 impact wrench that needs 5.1 SCFM @90 which would indicate that the CH air comp can't handle it. Maybe I bought an air comp that is too weak!! Should I have bought one over 10 gallons?






Paul, you'd need a much larger tank than 10 gallons to run an impact wrench for more than a few seconds.

The same advice applies.

Any air compressor will run any air tool as long as it generates the MOP (minimum operating air pressure of that tool).

A big air compressor will run an air tool for a long time without having to stop the tool and wait for the air to catch up.

A small air compressor will mean that, for some air tools, you will only get a few seconds use before the air is consumed, and since the compressor can't generate the flow rate of the tool, you will need to wait for the air pressure to regenerate.

I'm always in favour of a bigger air tank over a smaller one. The larger tank helps power an air tool for a longer period between waits, but with most home compressors, waiting for the air to catch up is part of the 'joy' of owning them.

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Die grinder low or high CFM?

by Robert Surdell
(Vernon , CT)

I am buying a Die grinder. Which CFM grinder should I go with. The 2.2 CFM or the 4 CFM? Or, which is better, a low CFM or High CFM? What are the advantages to each. Thank you
_________________

I've never been asked this question before, interesting. The flow of air to the tool has to be sufficient to rotate the vanes in the air tool.

It is logical to me, then, that a die grinder that demands a higher flow, will have larger vanes.

Yet, it is the pressure of the air that provides the work.

An air tool that runs with a minimum operating pressure of 50 PSI, for example, will likely have less force on the tool cutter than the same type of air tool with an 80 PSI MOP.

In your shoes, I would opt for the one that runs at the higher pressure.

Cheers,

Bill

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What air sanders can I use?

da sander - what da sander(s) i can use

I have a 30 gallon 6.0 HP ohv that runs 8.3 scfm @ 40psi and i need to know what da sander(s) i can use. I am completely sandy a car to paint.
Thank you!
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The compressor you have, a 6 HP, only produces 8.3 CFM at 40 PSI? Seems pretty low to me.

A 6 HP compressor should give you around 20 or so CFM at 90 PSI.

If your compressor is only putting out the flow you say, you will have a hard time running any air tool on an ongoing basis.

You need to check that out, and then, check the flow requirements in CFM and PSI for the sander. If the tool requires less than the compressor can supply, you're good to go.

Cheers,

Bill

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Is load cfm of an air tool important?

Is load cfm of an air tool important when sizing an air compressor.

Thank you.
_______________
Hi there...

If by load CFM you are referring to the number of CFM's an air tool will consume when operating, then yes, that figure is critical to selecting a large enough air compressor to power the air tool.

However, (there's always a however, isn't there?) the CFM demand of an air tool isn't enough. You need to know the pressure required by the air tool as well.

Working on the assumption that you will generate about 4 CFM of compressed air for every HP of electric compressor motor, you can, since many air tools like an operating pressure of 60-90 PSI, work back from the CFM requirement of an air tool to determine the HP of the motor.

It would be a good idea for you to read the Sizing pages on this site to better understand how this all fits together.

Hope this helps. Any further questions, please comment here.

Cheers,

Bill

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Sep 15, 2012
Air tool air usage
by: Mark

first thanks for your answer on my scfm question,second I was looking at air tools to size up a compressor and the scfm usage and the load usage greatly differ,witch do you use.If you use load scfm only very large compressors could run the tool. Again, thank you for your quick response to my question.
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The way I understand load CFM is that the numbers are based on the tool being run 25% of the time.

If you have a tool that uses 20 CFM at 90 PSI, and you plan on running it continuously in a production environment, then that tool will need a 4 HP compressor (at least) to supply the demand for just that one air tool.

You can't fudge the demand. If the tool needs X air flow at a certain PSI, and you give it Y air flow at that PSI, and the Y air flow is less, your air tool will not work properly.

You absolutely need to know the air demand of an air tool before deciding what air compressor you need to run it.

B.

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