AIR COMPRESSOR WIRING 110 or 220?

If I have a air compressor that gives me the option to wire it either 220 or 110 volt what is the difference , which is best.







Bill says...

If you consider that a compressor is a conversion device, turning electricity into stored kinetic energy in the form of compressed air, and if you consider that with a 220 Volt supply your air compressor will have much more electricity available to faster convert it into compressed air, then 220 Volts is the way to go, for sure.

I don't have 220 wired to my shop. Maybe one day I will as it would be of benefit, for sure.

Cheers,

Bill

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Nov 08, 2015
why or why not --220 V. or 110 V. Best?
by: Mr Nick W Wiese

Hi there after nearly 50 years of fixing and repairing many things! I would like to try to clear up some misunderstandings on House power in the USA. A power panel of today is rather simple, There are two hot legs in the back of the panel with a metal tab the the breakers clip into. So if a double pole breaker is used for 15,20 or 30 amps or more you get 110 or 115 volts at 20 or amps in each hot wire-but they are in different Phase (2 hot legs not one) as every other one is one from the left and one from the Right So there are more magnets in the motor that are not used on 110 plug So the catch is the term more power well yes but it is in 2 hot wires or just double- on the same side in the panel.The Motor has more power as there are more of the field winding's working!

Mar 03, 2013
220V service - Rick says "I agree with your conclusion, but your reasoning is nonsense. "
by: Rick

Bill said: "...if you consider that with a 220 Volt supply your air compressor will have much more electricity available to faster convert it into compressed air, then 220 Volts is the way to go"

A PhD engineer says: I agree with your conclusion, but your reasoning is nonsense.

A 220V service will provide more voltage, not more 'electricity'.

For a 'kinetic device' such as this (also called an electrical motor), operation at twice the voltage will halve the current - and thus there will less resistance (heat) losses in the electrical feeds (including power cable, extension cord, and permanent wiring).

This is the major reason to use 220V service whenever possible. Of course, the motor needs to be wired at the factory for 220V service - DO NOT just connect 220V service to a motor wired for 110V.

The torgue, speed, conversion time, and service of the compressor will be about the same - depending upon the line losses. If the feeds are suitably sized for 110V, then you will notice no difference in performance - but as horsepower increases for 110V service, these line feeds usually deteriorate service of the compressor.

220V service permits smaller feed diameters ('wire size') - thus saving copper and cost.

Alas, most of the world has this part correct compared to the USA. (The above comments apply to single-phase service only.)
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Thanks for the comment. Not all visitors are PHD's. :-)

B.

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Why does the compressor keep taking out the start capacitor?

by Jim
(Ft.Wayne)

General Air air compressor (photo: www.generalairproducts.com)

General Air air compressor (photo: www.generalairproducts.com)

The compressor is a 208 volt motor. General Air type. The voltage has been checked and is fine. Would increasing the wire size from 10 AWG to maybe 8 AWG help. I have been told that you can not have any voltage drop on a 208 volt system. I have checked the voltage on start up and I don't see a voltage drop. I took the motor to a motor repair shop and they said the motor checks out fine and just needed a new start capacitor. This is the second time.
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Jim, knowing how old (number of hours) that is on the air compressor would give folks a better idea of the why your start cap burns out.

One reason is that the start capacitors themselves have a flaw.

Another might be the excessive drawn on the cap when the motor is kicking off. That could be attributable to the motor itself (though you indicate yours checks out) or an increasing load in the pump affecting the motor start.

Are all facets of the compressor operation normal, except for the blowing of start caps?

Bill

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Electric speed switch wired wrong?

by Dan
(coldspring tx usa)

someone pulled cord out of motor wires came off i need to see motor terminal block schematic
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Dan, the assumption is that all motors are wired the same. I am not comfortable with that.

The access panel to the motor junction box may have a schematic on the back of the cover.

Failing that, what is the motor make? Can you contact them?

No joy there, maybe this will help:

electricmotorwarehouse.com/motor_connection_diagrams.htm

Or, you need an electrician.

I'm happy to post this for you so someone else can offer assistance if they can.

Good luck,

Bill

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where do the supply power wires hook to on an industral air

by julian
(benton ky)

need to know where supply leads go on industral air compressor v7518023 7.5 hp with starter

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Jan 07, 2014
starter wiring
by: Doug in s.d.ca

Typically:

Input power (mains) to L1 and L2

Motor to T1 and T2

Pressure switch to L1 and X2

That's for single phase power

Have fun.

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