Can the air compressors be installed on roof??

by Naman Sharma
(Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India)

Our company has got around 6-7 air compressors placed all around the company. We are in the process of installing them together at one place so as to ease the maintenance.

We came to know that, installing air compressors on the roof is beneficial.. Is it true?

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Bill says....

With adequate regard for the environment, yes, of course installing air compressors on the roof will work. Assuming the roof will handle the load, of course.

Please see the pages on LOCATION linked from the nav bar for more information about the things to be considered when installing an air compressor.

Cheers,

Bill

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having an air compressor indoors - is it safe

is it safe to run an air compressor in the house is it safe do they put out any kind of gas that you should not breath

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Bill says...

Depends on the type of air compressor.

If it is an electric motor driven compressor, and you have the correct power supply, you should not have any problem.

Electrically driven air compressors do not normally exude any non-safe substances when running.

The air out of the hose is not breathing quality air, as it may contain oil residue, dust etc., but then, you aren't planning on making the compressor output your only breathing air source, I would expect.

I use mine in the house (with ear plugs in) all the time. No negative effects, unless you consider that my recently growing third arm.... just kidding! :-)

I would never, however, consider using a gasoline, natural gas, diesel or other internal combustion type air compressors indoors. The exhaust from all of these could kill you.

Bill



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Winterizing Air Lines - use of a compressor in the winter?

by Sean Kessler
(Overland Park, KS)

Hello there!
I received a 33 gallon Husky compressor from my girlfriend last Christmas. (Best damn gift I ever got!!!) During the summer I plumbed it up to the "black pipe". The compressor and pipe are all located in the garage, but it's not heated. I was wondering if I need to do anything...drain it?? release some pressure?? take it all down, then put it all back up in the spring? (..not doing that one!)

Just some input would be amazing!!

Thanks!!
Sean

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A few things come to mind for winter compressor use, Sean.

First is, yeah, take it all down! (Naaa, just kidding!)

But, I have heard it gets mighty cold in Kansas? :-)

That being the case, and if it gets really, really cold where ever you are, how does your car or truck like starting when it is sub-zero? If it's like mine, it grumbles a whole lot, and sometimes there is not enough juice to even get it going at all.

If your compressor is oil lubed, what do you think happens to the oil in the sump when it’s sub-zero? thicker than molasses, for sure.

Don’t be surprised then when you go and try to start your really cold compressor, that you blow a fuse or breaker. If your motor cannot overcome the thick oil and frozen parts, it will overload.

Before you try to start it, then, somehow warm up your compressor.

When you installed your black pipe, I’m sure you followed my guidelines and the entire air main tilts slightly to one end, so water that condenses in that pipe can run down and out?

And, you took the drop lines off the top of the main, so that free water couldn’t flow down the drops to pool at the bottom?

In other words, if you have water in your lines in the winter, it will freeze. If you have enough water, it will freeze your valves, your cylinders, your air filters... it will freeze everything, solid! How will you air system work then.

When you are running your compressor, assuming you get it started, the quite hot, moist compressed air will hit your cold mains and water will condense instantly. It won’t be long with a running compressor and air being pulled from the main that you will have enough water in there to freeze and block the pipe. Then what?

If you intend to use your compressor in your conditions in the winter, assuming you can get it started, make sure you drain the lines, the drops, the filters and the compressor tank completely after every use. And warm up your compressor before you try to start it.

Good luck,

Bill


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Health risk of air compressors?

by Gerald Henderson
(New York, NY)

Can air compressors be used in homes to power common appliances such as a cake mixer? Or, is there a health risk involved? Just wondering why they aren't used more in homes. When they are so common in factories?
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Hi Gerald, welcome to you and all the other New York visitors.

No, there is no inherent risk with using a compressor in the house. When you go to the dentist, for example, when they are working on your teeth, their tools are powered by compressed air.

It's what's in the air that's blowing out of the compressor air tool (be it an air hammer or an air mixer) that could be the issue.

Have a look at this page about water issues.

This page talks about compressed air filters. You also want to read up on coalescent filters on this website too.

The issue isn't the use of the compressed air, it's what might end up in your cake mix if you aren't treating the compressed air properly.

Also, unless you have a remote air compressor and have air plumbed into, for example, the kitchen, lower end air compressors are very, very noisy and that would be an problem for most folks if they are contemplating using a compressor in the house.

Cheers,

Bill




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Can you lay a stand up air compressor down?

I was wondering if you can lay a upright compressor down for transport purpuses od would this hurt the compressor?
Any info would help thanks.
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If it's an oil lubed compressor, I wouldn't. Would you turn your car on it's side to transport?

Oil and crud will get into where it shouldn't, with long-term issues in the operation of your air compressor almost certain.

Nope, I wouldn't change the orientation of my air compressor to transport it.

Cheers,

Bill

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Compressor plumbing & noise suppression.

by John

I am putting a distribution system for my air compressor in my garage and basement workshop. Should I use black iron pipe, copper, modular aluminum pipe or hose?

I will be using air tools for car maintenance and woodworking.

2.- How should I build a noise suppression enclosure for horizontal 5HP, 30 gal. compressor.
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Hello John...

Thanks for your question and the answers will be part of the ebook The Home Compressor. I'm targetting the end of January '09 for completion, and I'll let you know when it's ready so you can have it at a discounted price if you wish.

With reference to your compressed air distribution, for many years black pipe was the norm due to it's relatively low cost for large diameter pipe. the installers used the black pipe for drops too, as the same sub-contractor would install all the air mains and drop lines.

Even though it's low cost, black pipe wouldn't be a first choice as far as I'm concerned due to it's tendency to rust and impart scale and rust to the compressed air stream.

Your least expensive option, albeit not so neat and tidy, is to use hose...that is if you can get hose large enough to handle for flow requirements.

For a dandy installation, if your budget can handle it, go copper. No rust. Looks real good.

If the aluminum is within your budget, and the pipe is rated for the pressures, a good option too.

As to noise suppression, first thing, put it behind a wall of some sort. And if that wall goes floor to ceiling, with an access door big enough to get to the compressor even better. Then, put insulation between the studs in the new wall, and you've got a sound-deadened compressor.

Use the small compressor room to store oil, spares and the manual for the compressor.

Don't forget to make it easy to get to your compressor drain to drain the tank. If I were you, I'd plumb that compressor tank drain out of the room, and put an auto drain in the line.

And, if the compressor room is smallish, make sure it's got a vent to allow free air into the room. Best option, plumb the compressor intake outside through the wall to pull free air from there.

Cheers, and happy new year.

Bill

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my air compressor fell over now not working and tripping reset breaker

by Jeff
(medford, Oregon)

Hello, I have a brand new air compressor made by Alltrade. It is a 19 gallon upright Electric motor. My son was using it for the second time it was ever used and accidently pulled to hard on the hose and it fell over. Well now it wont start or run. The motor hums for just a second or two then the reset button pops out. I can push the reset and itll do the same thing over and over. I dont see any broken parts or pieces loose, any ideas. IM bummed my new compressor is a pile of junk at this point. Thanks!

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If the motor is humming (no, it's not happy) it means that it's trying to start and cannot.

Can you rotate the compressor pump or motor sheaves by hand... maybe pull off the belt first? Careful you don't get your fingers jammed. If the shafts have been bent by impact with the floor, that could account for the motor being unable to start.

If both sheaves rotate freely, then check the pressure switch for damage.

Give us an update when you've checked out these things, K?

Bill

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Can I stand up a horizontal oiless compressor?

by Xander
(Fort Myers, FL)

I have a small horizontal CH air compressor. It has 2 wheels on back and handle on front. I had to rearrange my workshop and now do not have room for the compressor in its horizontal state but could stand it on end. The compressor is oiless and electric. Is this possible or do I run a chance of ruining the compressor?
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Xander, if yours was an oil lubed compressor I would say definitely not. You wouldn't run your car on it's side, would you?

That yours is oil-less may mean that it could work, but frankly, I just don't know.

Anyone else?

Thanks,

Bill

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