compressor location - I need to install a compressor for a mini printing press

I need to buy a compressor for a mini printing press for my wife's screen printing.


The mfg suggests a unit providing at least 7CFM @ 90psi, a Speedaire 4ME96 from Grainger.

Bigger than what I wanted, but that's life.

I want to site it in the unfinished, dirt floor basement of her studio. It's always cool there albeit somewhat damp.

My intent is to cover the floor in heavy plastic to keep down the moisture and hard wire a 220 switch inside her studio so she can turn it on/off as needed.

I need it to be as maintenance-free as possible as I may not be on location to look after it. Is my scenario OK? Any options I haven't considered? Thanks!
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Good that you are giving some thought to installing the compressor correctly and safely.

More than below is on the Installation pages linked from the site map.

Will the press be running daily? That being the case, I would not recommend that you turn off the compressor with the power switch, rather, rely on the integral pressure switch to shut the compressor off when it reaches the normal cut out. That way, there is air in the tank to start work each day.

I don't know the cycle of the silk screen press, though the compressor you've picked should supply a constant flow of air, even if the press is working non-stop.

Don't forget the electric auto drain for the tank, so your wife doesn't have to crawl under the tank to drain it each day, or worse, forget to do so.

What about the air intake? How big is this area? Any chance of pulling too much air and starving the compressor? If so, consider plumbing an air feed to the vicinity of the air intake filter from outside. That will augment the air in the studio. You can use a coil-dryer hose for this, with a screen on the outside to keep out bugs. Just have the inside opening near the intake, or a window open.

What about noise. This sucker is going to be loud?

Just a few thoughts...

Good luck.

Bill



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Filters for a printer

by Buzz
(Burnsville NC)

Hi Bill: Thanks for your already very useful information.

Our compressor arrived, A Campbell Hausfeld 26 gal 10.2 CFM @ 90 psi.

The one and only device we'll be running is a small screenprinter that consumes 25 cubic INCHES/minute per cycle.

The compressor is sited in an unfinished damp-prone basement area and i want to filter the air as much as possible for mostly moisture, but other contaminants such as mold.

The information I've just tried to digest is a bit much for my ability.......what's your best recommendation for filters and their placement for our application?

Thanks much,

Buzz
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Buzz, are you trying to clean up the air before it gets into the compressor intake, or are you trying to clean it up after the compressor and before it gets to the printer?

Aside from the long term negative repercussions of moisture on the exterior of the compressor (rush & dust etc.) I wouldn't worry too much about the intake. Just make sure the compressor isn't under water! :-)

If the intent is to prepare the air before use by your printer, put a general purpose air filter upstream a bit from the printer.

If moisture is an ongoing issue, install another air filter with a 5 micron filter in it downstream from the general purpose filter, and then plumb the air to the printer.

Monitor the air, and if moisture continues to be a problem, then you may need to add a desiccant filter after the 5 micron filter and before the printer.

If the aren't sure about what I'm saying, please read the pages on this site about compressed air filtering and water issues.

Cheers,

Bill

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compressed air storage and location

by karen
(christchurch, new zealand)

where should it be stored and what care is to be taken when handling?
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Hi Karen...

Compressed air is not flammable. It's energy can be explosive though, if an opening should occur in a tank or air vessel.

Yet compressed air tanks are equipped (or should be) with pressure relief valves that prevent them from being over pressurized.

Tank inspection should tell you whether or not the vessel has any surface issues that might lead to tank failure, which is a remote possibility unless the tank has been left with high water content in it, or has been abraded or damaged on the surface.

So, please tell me, when you say how should it be stored, could you expand on this? What are you storing, a compressor tank? More info as a comment here, please.

Cheers,

Bill

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running large industrial air compressors installed in a shipping container


Good day.
I would like to install 3X90kW air compressors into a 12 metre shipping container for operation at a remote dusty mining site. Day temperatures can exceed 40 degrees C but average 30 degrees C.

The idea would be to modify one end of the container with a bolt on blower and washable filter module to force dust-free air into the container at the rate of 2100 m3/h which is the feed flow required by the compressors. Each compressor's exhaust to be ducted out of the container. A positive pressure of around 1 bar to be maintained inside the container by controlling a butterfly exhaust valve in the container wall.

Question: will there be an unmanageable excess built up of heat within the container?

How practical is this design?

Regards Andrew
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Andrew, what you have proposed makes sense, though I too am concerned about the possibility of heat build up.

What I would do is install a number of filtered intake "windows". Make these windows much larger than the total intake area of all compressors, so the compressors themselves can pull in air as needed, and you don't need a fan to get the air into the container for the compressors.

Then, I would install one fan that would also pull air into the container and exhaust it, presumably along with the heat. That fan might be connected to a thermal switch so that it went on only when the heat in the container exceeded your desired set point.

Will the heat build up be unmanageable? Doubt it. Will you have to modulate the air flow to deal with it? Probably.

It would be nice to have an update as a comment here telling us how this worked out.

Cheers,

Bill

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What size compressor do I need - location issues

We have a display of about 4-6 air ride seats in our showroom. These seats are the types in semi-trucks. We are trying to find the right compressor for the job. We need it so be as quite as possible and enough power. Most likely no more then two seats at a time will be operated. Could help us out and let us know which air compressor we need?

Thanks,Justin
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Justin, if you have read the Sizing pages - as you no doubt have :-] - you will know that one of the first things you need to know when sourcing an air compressor is the flow demand of the devices you plan on running with the compressed air.

Having said that, I don't know from air-ride systems, yet I expect they are either a small air cylinder(s) or perhaps an air spring. I further presume that you charge these with air to a certain air pressure, and that air pressure is trapped inside, to allow the air device to self-compress and expand as force (my large butt on the driver's seat, for example) is exerted on these air cushions.

If I am close to correct, then I suspect you need a very small air compressor for them to operate properly.

Since you have not given me any air consumption numbers, what I suggest is that you visit your local rent all type store, and rent a 2 HP, or so, air compressor, to try out in the shop. You can get a 2 HP to run acceptably on a 120 VAC circuit, so you won't have to do any special wiring to install it near the showroom.

If the distance from the air compressor to the demos is longer than the air hose that comes with the rental, rent a longer hose. Do not use an electrical extension cord to move the compressor too the demos. That may have a negative affect on the motor, and, since small DIY type air compressors are quite loud, having the compressor elsewhere, and running air to the demos with a longer air hose, is the way to go.

Good luck, and maybe keep us posted as a comment here as to how it turned out, K?

Cheers,

Bill

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Compressor Install near a wall

How close can I place my 5hp, 60 gal compressor to a wall (the wall behind the unit)? It is open on all other sides. My manual says to allow 24" on all sides for access. I can access this unit with 14", if I place it the full 24" the unit will be in my work space. Is there a heat or air flow issue that is not listed in manuals?
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Compressor pumps get very hot when they run, even if all things are good regarding installation. The primary issues are adequate cooling as far as I am concerned.

Try it. If the compressor goes off on thermal overload, then it's getting too hot. Or, you can install a fan to one side of the pump and turn it on while the compressor is running. That will more than make up for the proximity issue.

Cheers,

Bill

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How hot should a 3hp air compressor head get

by Steve
(San Diego Ca)

top of the head gets around 250 degrees. Its a Montgomery Wards 3hp twin cylinder compressor.

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Steve, that's a tough one to answer. No manual I've seen give you the expected pump head temperature, as I expect that is a moving target.

All pump heads will get so hot, particularly under heavy compressor use, that they will burn skin quite badly.

The high temp of the compressor head is why the air line from the pump to the tank is made of fire resistant material.

Are you asking the question because you've notice it getting hotter? Or, did you just note if for the first time?

I don't have the specs, but if you do, make sure you know what the duty cycle of the compressor is, and do not exceed that. If you are not sure, run the compressor for 15 minutes max at a time, and allow it at least that length of time to cool down.

Cheers,

Bill

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ridgid model 0L50145MD operate standing vertically?

Can ridgid air compressor model 0L50145MWD be operated standing vertical or does it have to be placed on a level surface. I want to mount it in the back of my work truck and use it strapped at a vertical position
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Since this model is oil lubed, let me ask you if you would run your truck motor if your truck was on it's side? Nope, since all the crud in the bottom of the oil sump, and the oil itself, would get places it's not supposed to. I expect the same situation applies to a horizontally oriented air compressor rotated 90 degrees.

It were my air compressor, I sure wouldn't run it vertically.

Cheers,

Bill

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Noise Reduction

by Robert Dopp
(Marietta, GA USA)

I have a new Porter-Cable 6 gallon pancake air compressor that works very well, but is VERY noisy. Is there anything go can do? Is there a muffler I can purchase? I am ready to mount it inside a box full of foam! Any suggestions would be VERY welcome.
Best Regards,
Bob

Robert Dopp
rbdopp@doppstien.com
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Robert, this is addressed on a number of pages on this website.

I have moved this post to the Instillation-Location section.


There are a number of pages here, as well as comments, which relate to the noise level and how to abate that noise.

Your padded box is a great idea. Watch out for air intake and overheating, though.

Cheers,

Bill


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