How to fill a 7gal Camp/Hau air tank?

by Howard
(Fl)

When I open valve to fill, air rushes out of inflating end - when I attach hose of compressor the air is still escaping from inflating end but very very slowly, should air be exiting the hose you use for inflating while filling the tank?


___________________
Bill says...

Howard, if you are talking about filling a portable air tank, then no, air should not escape when you are filling it.

If I could see the tank fittings then I could be more specific as to possible causes.

Go to the sitemap page, and click the link to the Brad Nailer tank. Maybe the photo and description there will help.

Cheers,

Bill

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Plumbing Air Pro II

by Ray
(El Sobrante, CA USA)

I believe the part I am looking for is the valve, but I am uncertain.

My Air Pro II, 4 HP, 30 gallon compressor is for general work, and I received it from a friend who had received it from someone, etc., etc., etc..

In general it checked out an operated fine when I gave it a casual once-over. Upon investigating a leak, I discovered that the threads on the valve(?) line out tap, were largely missing and or cracked. Examining the issue closer, the fitting broke off in my hand to reveal that the only reason it was still in place is that someone along the line had used caulking, epoxy, and nearly everything else to plug the leak, and hold it together.

This part has the tank pressure gage, the line from the tank, the PRV, the line out and the pressure switch taps. It is a cheap little thing, cast out of what I recall was once called "pot-metal". I am one to restore thing properly, with the intention of having them last longer and function better. To that end I would like to replace the whole assembly, including the regulators, gages, PRV, etc., with something better than what I have, and not just patch cheap parts on top of a decent replacement.

I do appreciate any suggestions, help and/or guidance.

Thanks much,
Ray
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Ray, good plan to change it out for something of better quality.

You can't go wrong if you build the new assembly out of copper tube and fittings. Even better if you sweat them, for strength and leak resistance.

Or, you might consider going and getting an air manifold, a chunk of pipe or threaded tube with an in-port on both ends, and out-ports along the side, into which you can plumb your various accessories.

Cheers,

Bill

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Jan 24, 2011
A clear understanding...
by: Ray Waldo~

Bill,

Thanks for the suggestions.

So in terms of the manifold, this would essentially be a pipe "T", or even two "Ts" stacked? Is this something that I could assemble out of copper tube and appropriate taps, or is there a better/more recommended way?

Thanks again,
Ray~

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The thing is, you can add an air manifold configured any way you like that suits you best.

Yes, it can be 2 tee's, or a pipe with holes, whatever.

As long as you can connect the new part to the tank discharge port (you need to know the NPT size), then make the manifold to suit your needs.

Now is the time to add a compressed air filter before your regulator. This keeps the airborne water and dust out of your regulator, and will give it longer life.

Not happy with one discharge coupling to your air line? Add two or three, or seven! Whatever plumbing you need to make connection easier for you, is what you can achieve if you build your own manifold.

I mentioned using 1/2" copper as you can build a manifold for a few bucks, it's easily worked with, can be solder sweated to make an air tight manifold, and you can get a host of fittings from the plumbing store to make your manifold anyway you want.

Is there a better (read easier) way? Sure, just find exactly what you've got and remove and replace what's there.

You can, if you wish, make it better.

Bill


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air leak location

how to find air leak

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Bill says...

Hmmmm? An air leak in what? An air mattress, a car tire...?

Friend, you want to give me a whole lot more info than just that if you want a specific answer.

If the air leak pertains to an air piping system, you have a couple of choices. You can find ultra-sonic leak detectors if finding and repairing your leak is very important, or, do the bubble test.

Mix a cup of warm water with a teaspoon of liquid dish soap, and brush this onto every joint. If air is leaking, bubbles will form almost immediately.

Cheers,

Bill






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Grizzly Compressor ~ What is the band or model of the compressor shown on your "Tank Check Valve" page?

by Joe Papineau
(Maple Valley, WA)

I am trying to find a replacement check valve for a Grizzly compressor and have had no luck. Grizzly no longer has the part. It is the same valve that is shown in the picture on your "Tank Check Valve" page.

http://www.about-air-compressors.com/tank-check-valve.html

Do you know the brand or model of the compressor the valve is on?

Thank you

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Bill says...

Hello Joe. Yes, I do. That compressor is sold in Canada by a company called Canadian Tire. It's one of their low-cost DIY type air compressors, that's stood me in good stead for years.

You should be able to use a check valve assembly from any similar sized compressor for yours.

As long at you can thread the check valve into the tank (even if you need to use a bushing) and be able to connect up the line from the pump and the line to the unloader valve, virtually any similar check valve should work.

You may want to check with the area companies that sell industrial air valves and cylinders. They often sell compressors too, and you have a much better chance of getting spares from a company like that than you will from retail outlets.

Cheers,

Bill

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re: install an extra air tank?

by Ruel Hernandez
(Jeddah, Saudi Arabia)

I am planning to buy an extra air tank but I'm not sure about the connection.
Is it in series or parallel, and what would be the difference between series and parallel air tanks?

I would like to thank you, your site is very interesting.

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Bill says...

Ruel.. nice to hear from you.

An extra air tank always has benefits to an air system in that it provides readily available pre-compressed air for tool use, and it allows the hot compressed air coming from the compressor to naturally cool, reducing load on driers, and energy costs.

Lets look a bit at what I think you mean about series and parallel. Series and parallel are two basic ways of plumbing components.

The names refer to the method of attaching components. Either one after the other, or next to each other.

Lets consider a very simple air circuit consisting of two air tools and one compressor air line.

If the air line runs to one air tool, and then from that one tool to the next air tool, this is considered to be plumbed in series.

If, on the other hand, the air line tees, and one line goes to one air tool, and the other goes to the other air tool, this is a parallel air circuit.

In your case, your compressor will be supplying air to both tanks.

My thought is that you do a parallel installation, with the air line teeing from the compressor discharge. One line goes to the existing tank, and the other runs to the other end of your shop, where you install the other tank.

Then, both tanks are plumbed up into the air main, providing a source of compressed air entering the ring from two locations.

Cheers,

Bill


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pipe sizing for air

by tony
(houston tx)

The tank is 125psi. I have to run pipe 400ft.One of the impacts have to run constant at 105cfm and one at 45cfm.So I will have a total of 150cfm. what line size should run.






Bill answers...

Hey Tony, nice to hear from Texas!

I think everything you need to know to answer your questions is available on the pages in this site.

Just start at the site map page and click the link to the pages referring to Plumbing, and you may want to look at the page on Pressure Drop as well.

Heck, look at all the pages. :-) It's all there about how to plumb your air compressor.

Cheers,

Bill

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Air delivery system.

by J.D.
(Napa Valley, CA)


As ABS is approved for air delivery systems I am thinking of building a system per the attached drawing.
The alternative is 3/4" copper. I am aware that copper will dissipate heat better than plastic, but the increased surface area of the 4" ABS should more than compensate. It would have the additional plus of more air storage capacity. The price for each system is about the same. Any comments would be appreciated.






Bill answers...

Hi J.D.

Nice to hear from Napa Valley, which is where I would like to be right now, considering it's snowing as I look out my office window.

First off, I would NEVER use a hard plastic like ABS for compressed air. If it lets go, it shatters, generating lots of shrapnel.

Where did you hear that ABS is approved for compressed air? That's news to me. Don't do it!

Nice schematic. Sorry though. I can't read all the words... and no, it's not just my eyes. I enlarged the photo and still can't make out what they all say, so I'm not quite sure what the purpose of your air delivery system is, unless you have drop lines from various points along the runs.

Or, it looks to me like you are using the run to cool the air before it gets to the application?

Regardless, you are right, a 4" line would in itself be a substantial air reservoir for the downstream appliances. Just don't use plastic, unless the manufacturer is prepared to send you confirmation of application in writing. I've talked to some plastic pipe people, and with only one exception, they do not recommend using their products for compressed air.

Go with the copper.

Cheers,

Bill

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Apr 25, 2009
Only if you encapsulate it
by: Anonymous

I am not an expert, but I think that you could use Hardware Store PVC in this case, BUT ONLY IF you built a plywood box around it with vent holes at the top and bottom. As a general rule, PVC can take the pressure for years, but when it fails, it throws sharp bits at high speed all over the room. By placing a half inch sheet of plywood around the entire PVC register, it would capture any thrown plastic, rendering it harmless. Copper is normally the better choice, but the cost might be too high in this case.

Apr 05, 2009
Thanks Bill.
by: J.D.

The info is at http;//torque1st.clubfte.com/OSHA PVC Pipe.htm. Should have read it more carefully, it says "approved ABS such as Duraplus". I doubt if that is what my local Home Depot carries. Again thanks for your comments.






Anytime...thanks for visiting.

Bill

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Plumbing a new air electric compressor

by Hayes Hatcher
(falling waters, w.va.)

I have an old electric compressor that threw a rod and i bought a new compressor for it. Problem is that new compressor has only one line coming off the head. My old one has a waterpump type pressure switch on it and that is mounted on a manifold. The old pressure switch has a "main" line and a secondary (smaller) line that goes into the old pressure switch. I need a list of parts needed to "plumb" the new "single line" to the old manifold. I can find a "waterpump" pressure switch and set the air to cut off at about 90psi and to cut on at about 35psi. I can plug the old manifold with screw in plugs. would rater have a kit from an air compressor store.

_____________________
Bill says...

I'm a bit confused by what your problem is.

If your new compressor works, it already has a pressure switch that works, and the only issue is that you need to have more than one outlet for the air, why not simply plumb the one outlet into a store bought air manifold that will give you almost as many outlets that you could want?

Is that what you are trying to do?

This is what I'm talking about:

http://www.alkoncorp.com/products/fittings/category/series-mq-manifolds-with-pre-installed-push-in-fitting-cartridges/

Cheers,

Bill

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SIZING COMPRESSED AIR LINES

by Ron
(Rochester NY, USA)

Hello (sorry didn't get your name) I am an MEP (Mechanical,Electrical,Plumbing for the building construction industry) engineer/designer here in Rochester NY. I concentrate mostly on the plumbing and fire protection aspect of the business.

That is during the day. When I go home I try to work on my website. It looks much like yours...you wouldn't be a fellow SBI'er would you. I am impressed with your user friendly layout and look. I have not had the time I would like to keep up with my site but take a look you might like it if you are interested in classic rock music.

www.classic-rock-legends-start-here.com

OK I did have a legitimate question.

I will be working on providing 6 to 8 compressed air drops to a University laboratory classroom from an existing compressor system. I am not that up on compressed air but I imagine that the drops to a blow-off gun or quick-disconnect would be 1/2"... but I need more info on how they will be using the air and compressor specs. Do you have any guidelines for determining the pipe size needed for X amount of CFM or do you have access to a chart that sizes copper pipe, for example for the amount of air needed at the termination point or for an x amount of CFM?

Thanks, looking forward to your response
Ron

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Bill says...

SBIer indeed!

Review the plumbing pages on this site, and then look at for info on air flow through an orifice and info on pressure drop. From these you can "guestimate" flow.

And yes, you need to know the flow requirements to figure out line size... or, simply use a 1/4" drop to a blow off. At 90 PSI, that's often enough.

Cheers, and good luck with your websites.

Bill

P.S. Did have a look at your site. Neat stuff!

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Compressor setup 101

by Bob
(Delaware)

I have a new 80 Gal, 5hp, 3 cylinder (piston style) compressor. I have been using it for some tools and blaster, no real problems, some water in the line when blasting.

I am going to start priming and painting soon, so I need to set up the externals. As of now, I have a single line that goes up to the ceiling and to the tool, small air filter but nothing else.

I have been reading the pages here and I am planning on changing the setup.

1st, the plumbing, I want to run new lines up the wall and maybe back down and up again so that water can run off, using a T fitting and not an elbow.

I also want to run a second tank, anywhere from 10 to 20 gallon. This should help the air cool.

Questions:

1) Should I run the line up and down the wall before or after the second storage tank?

2) Should I use a steel line, or would hose or plastic be better to eliminate water?

3) The compressor is set at 155PSI, and since I need way less for painting, I assume that I can change the time it kicks on to a lower psi setting.

4) I am just not sure on what the best setup sequence would be, main tank, filter, line then extra tank, or extra tank first, etc etc.

5) Is there a simple home made contraption that would help dry the air?

_________________
Bill says...

Sure a lot of questions, Bob. I welcome them and your visit. The answers to pretty much all of them are found on the pages of the site.

To help your proceed, here are some short answers.

1) After, but not up an down. Take the drop off the top of the main not from the bottom. See plumbing pages for details.

2) Copper, rubber then polyethylene. Please read the plumbing pages and hose and tube pages for details. The air line material has little impact on water in the lines. Read the pages on Water to see where and why there is water in compressed air.

3)Leave the cut out pressure at 155 and use a regulator anywhere you can to use less pressure at the application.

4)Please see the pages on "Adding a tank" linked from the sitemap.

5) For painting I would use an in line chemical desiccant air dryer. There pages of info linked from the water pages that talk about how to treat compressed air to make it right for your application.

You can build a water jacket drier or use an old refrigerator, but for most apps, proper plumbing, well placed water removal filters, and at point of use, a higher level water and water removal device will do. All covered in the pages on this site.

Cheers,

Bill






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Plumbing a stationary air compressor

by David
(Seattle, Wa)

When plumbing a stationary compressor and using hard lines (copper or steel) should there be a special connection between the compressor and the hard lines to isolate compressor vibration and prevent possible failure of piping or joints ?

__________________

Bill says...

David, my experience has been, and I've seen some pretty big installations, that compressors do not ordinarily have any alignment or vibration reducing couplings from the air discharge to the mains.

The larger compressors can be installed on elastomeric mounts to isolate them from the floor.

Which isn't to say that if you are seeing significant vibration transfer, that you cannot isolate your compressor from the mains if you feel it necessary.

To be certain, ask this question of the compressor supplier from whom you obtained your compressor.

Cheers,

Bill



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What is the best way to setup a compressor system with what I have?

by Rick Letzelter
(Homerville, OH USA)

I have a compressor set up on a motor set drive system, and a seperate 200 gallon air tank.

My air compressor is a 2 stage compressor. I want to set it up with the proper shut offs, pop off valves on the tank, and air drying system. I will need more air volume in the future.

How can I set up an air compressor system with what I have?

__________________________
Bill says...

Hi Rick. Essentially, you are asking me to re-type in this reply much of the information that is already on the pages of this site in abundance.

Please have a look at the plumbing pages, the drier pages, and so on. Pretty much all you want to know is already here.

Once you have figured out the generalities, if you have a specific question about the plumbing, I'll be glad to provide a response if I can.

Cheers,

Bill

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