Difference between a 6 gl and a 33 gal tank?

by KRIS SMITH
(YORK)

what is the difference between a 6 gl and a 33 gal air compresser

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Kris, aside from the obvious, the tank size, there could be significant differences between the air compressors (two different models - two different manufacturers - two different motor HP) or the two compressors might be the same on all counts except tank size.

Since I have no detailed info about the two air compressors except the tank size, I cannot provide any more info for you.

Please post a comment here with more info if you wish.

Cheers,

Bill

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Accumulator capacity

by vadivel
(india,tamil nadu ,coimbatore)

5odia piston cylinder stroke length 100mm operating pr.8 bar moving 2sec for forward and 2sec. for reverse so what is the air loss ?

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Bill says...

Vadivel, thanks for writing in.

I don't understand your question, however. It doesn't appear to have anything to do with accumulator capacity.

Cheers,

Bill



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What size of tank? Should I have an FRL

by Jeff

1. Pancake versus Tank/Conventional, which is better and why?

2. Should a home system have a FRL unit?

Last, a matrix showing different usages with recommended compressor size would be helpful.






Bill answers...

Hi Jeff:

I've already sent you information about your "deal" on The Home Compressor ebook. Thank you for your questions.

The ebook has a chapter on Tank & Tank Size and the ramifications. I can tell you here that the shape of the tank is more for the manufacturer's benefit than yours. You should be concerned most with the capacity of the tank.

Every compressor should have at least one filter and regulator. I say at least one, as one of each should be on the discharge line right at the tank.

Depending on how you are using air, if you have a manifold on your workbench supplying a number of different tools or applications for example, you may want more regulators to be able to adjust air pressure to certain tools and have those supplied at a different pressure than others. Rule of thumb about air tools is you run them at the lowest pressure that gets the job done. This reduces your air and energy consumption, and may have some positive ramifications for the life of the air tool as well.

When air travels through air lines, it cools, and more water condenses out. It is possible then that even after passing through an air filter at the tank, you will still see water at other locations in your shop. The solution is to add an air filter as close to the end application as possible, to remove as much water as possible before it has a chance to condense further in the line and before the wet air can get to the application.

As to the lubricator, all air tools need air tool oil to keep them rust free and to reduce wear on the vanes and other internal components. The issue is always how much oil? If the lubricator is close to the air tool then oil from it will actually get to the tool and do some good. Don't overlubricate. If the air tool is at the end of a 25 foot hose, and you aren't using it much, all you will be doing is wetting the air hose with oil, and not a whole lot will get to the tool, at least not for a long time. 2-3 drops into the connector on the tool before you use it, and 2-3 drops after you are done is usually enough, unless you are using if for a long time. Then you might want to look at an inline air tool lubricator, which is different from the ones that are on a "normal" FRL.

All of these points are covered in The Home Compressor ebook in detail.

Cheers,

Bill

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What mystery tank used for


Pursuant to my earlier post, here is a more detailed photo of the tank that I'm unsure of. Anybody have any idea what this thing is for? I think it has three seperate but connected chambers. The compressor must connect to it, it connects to a larger resovoir, and the output of air comes from this little tank too. I suspect that it is a moisture seperator but I'd like confirmation.

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