What is a tank setup like this for?


I'm a hobbyist woodworker and I've recently set up a little paint booth in my garage. I've been able to spray small projects with a combination of 6 and 12 gallon compressor, but I wanted to add capacity. You can get by with 12 gallons for little projects, but it is still annoying to have to wait for your compressor to catch up.


So I picked up an extra tank on Kijiji and I think I really scored with this set-up. The resovoir is 25 gallons I think (4 feet by 1 foot tank) but my question pertains to the secondary tank that I got along with the big one.

The second tank seems to have two compartments that are joined together by some piping and I'm not sure what it is for. Is it a moisture seperator? I'll upload a picture of the set-up and I would appreciate any info that people could offer as to what the little tank is for. But for $50 I'ma pretty happy camper. I'm just going to connect this set-up to my old 12 gallon oiled and see what happens.
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Not sure myself, Bryan. It looks to me like the smaller tank was heated, if those are band heaters I see on the outside of the smaller tank.

I wonder if this may have been a hot water source for something? Anyone else?

Do look for the ANSI or other sort of label / plate on the tank to make sure it is rated for your compressor pressure.

And, do watch out for duty cycle on your compressor. If it is not continuous run, then it may overheat since now it is filling a much larger tank.

Cheers,

Bill

Comments for What is a tank setup like this for?

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Dec 07, 2011
Not heating bands
by: Anonymous

The silver bands you see were just aluminum strapping to hold the tank against the wall. The little tank definitely held compressed air as it has a pressure gauge on it and was attached to ther larger tank via a small hose. I've taken a more detailed picture and added some labels to it so I think I'll make another posting with that picture and it might give people more clues to go on.

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Very good.

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High Pressure Compressors to a common tank

by Abhivansh Narang
(India)

Plumbing of High Pressure Compressors to a common tank

I have 4 high pressure IR 15T2 compressors installed in my plant running at pressure of 25kg/cm2 ( around 360psi ) connected to a common tank. The outlet of the compressors is 1/2". Each compressor has its own pipeline snaking through the walls to the common tank.

I would need some advice to what diameter pipe would be sufficient to handle all the four compressors so i can replace the four pipes with a single bigger pipeline. Please also educate me on what ratio i should increase the pipeline for future expansions.

And how can i reduce the back-pressure from one compressor to the other when connected to the common pipe?

Cheers
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Abhivansh, each line from each compressor should have a non-return, or check valve, installed before the common line to prevent back flow.

Follow the links from the PRESSURE DROP page which is linked from the site map to get information about air flow through a specific port.

Cheers,

Bill

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How to remove Inspection plugs?

by Doug Mullen
(Livonia, MI)

Compressor tank inspection plug

Compressor tank inspection plug

Hi I would like to remove my inspection plug. See photo, wrench size required is 1-1/4". If I put all my weight (200lbs.) on it and bounce it will not budge. The vertical tank wants to tip over. I guess I should bolt the tank to the floor and get a long pipe to give me some leverage. I don't think applying heat to the plug would be a good idea.

Please give me your thoughts on how to remove this 2" NPT plug.
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Painted in? Welded in? I can't tell.

It were me, with the tank empty of air, and assuming that the plug is not welded, I'd use a torch to heat up the thread area to try and break it loose.

Of course, that will burn the nice paint job!

Cheers,

Bill

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Air receiver tank wall thicknes

by Stephen
(Pretoria, South Africa)

Good morning Bill :-) (from a cold South-Africa)

I am busy with a custom made compressor for my self.

I need this compressor to store about between 15 bar to 18 bar of pressure at about 1'500 meter above sea level. Receiver (tank) size will be about 150 liter(plus - minus)

I am going to have a receiver (tank) custom made then pressure tested once its done.
My question to you is: What would you recommend the steel thickness to be?
I have 10mm in mind, would it be sufficient?

Looking forward to your respond :-)
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Hello Stephen.

Your best bet to get an answer to this question is contacting tank manufacturers or, an engineer.

I haven't the skills to recommend a wall thickness for a compressed air tank that will contain 18 bar (260 PSI), though I suspect that the wall thickness a few mm thicker than any standard air tank would suffice. See the tank plate on any air tank for pressure ranges.

Incidentally, your other post went missing because of no return email address to tell you where it ended up.

Cheers,

Bill

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