What is an air receiver service valve?

by John Boy
(Florence SC USA)

I don't know a thing about air compressors. I just bought a new one. Instructions say, " Before initial start-up, open the air receiver service valve".


Is the air tank the same as a air receiver. I am really dumb, I know. ( and the instruction booklet is very evasive).

Is the service valve the same as a check valve?


Thanks, I remaind,

John Boy
__________________
Howdy, John Boy.

Nope, there's no such thing as dumb questions. Or, the only really dumb question is the one that you don't ask!

Now, " Before initial start-up, open the air receiver service valve" is a new one on me. I'm surprised that your manual doesn't point to the valve in question?

I'm going to guess that the "service valve" they refer to is the drain valve on the tank. And, I suspect they are going to tell you to leave it open while the compressor breaks in. But, since I don't know what a "receiver service valve" is, that's just a guess.

Yup, a receiver is just a college person's word for an air tank.

Good luck.

Bill

Comments for What is an air receiver service valve?

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Jan 21, 2011
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by: null

The Receiver Service Valve, or by it's more accepted name: king valve, is the valve next to the receiver. When the high pressure vapor leaves the compressor, it goes onto the receiver, where there is a mixture of vapor/liquid. The king valve is basically a safety to ensure that no vapor moves past the condenser.

________________
Thank you!

B.


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Plumbing additional air tanks & stainless steel tanks?

by Gary

I have an 80 gal.receiver mated to a true 5 HP motor.

I have a media blast cabinet (modified with a pressure pot ,rather than siphon feed , for more efficiency).

My question is : I have two stainless steel ,60 gal. air receivers (salvaged,for free, from liquid nitrogen containers) that I wish to add to my air supply.

They will let an increased volume of air accumulate , giving me more blasting time.

Because I will have more volume on hand, I will have the compressor shut off at ,say, 100 lbs. rather than 180 lbs., thereby reducing the strain on the compressor.

Is this a good idea ?

I know the compressor would love it because I understand it works much harder at higher compression numbers.I am just not sure if I am on the right track . I never use more than 90 lbs. when blasting.

Thoughts ?

The stainless vessels might be a topic to mention in your book. Can you imagine the cost of a stainless vessel if you were to buy it ? No rust from moisture, etc. . Yes, one must Tig weld stainless fittings as needed but it is still , I think , a great idea. Probably though, for liability reasons, you can only recommend certified pressure vessels.






Bill answers...

Hi Gary:

First off, yes, your email is now on the list to get an introductory price on my new ebook "The Home Compressor". When it's ready, I'll let you know, and if you want to take advantage of the intro price, you will be welcome to do so for a limited time. The ebook is actually coming along nicely. I was working on it today, in fact.

Good question, and a good tip. Though you are right, I would never recommend the use of a non-ASME tank, because if it isn't rated and tested for the pressures being used, it could suffer catastrophic failure.

Turning down the 'cut-out' pressure (high set point) of your compressor from 180 can't hurt it...though if that's the setting on the pressure switch when you got the compressor, then it should be built for producing compressed air at that pressure, you would think.

But you are right, compressing air to a lower level uses less energy and creates less wear and tear on the compressor.

However, have you considered that your air compressor will have to cycle on and off more often when the 'cut out' pressure is lower?

I expect you would simply transfer the wear and tear from the piston to the starting circuit...?

Media blasting (or sand blasting) equipment sucks up a lot of compressed air, and if you lower the differential between high set point and low, your compressor will have to cycle on and off more often as it attempts to keep the pressure in the tank above the 'cut in' pressure. Since the high pressure is now lower, the compressor air tank's pressure will reach the 'cut in' pressure faster, resulting in more rapid cycling of your unit.

It's a toss up...but I'll go with my first comment. If it's designed and built to produce 180 PSI, then it darn well should do so while lasting a long, long time.

Cheers,

Bill


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Problem with the non return valve

I bought a seccond hand compressor over from someone, it looks to be a good buy, but their is one problem.

When i turned the compressor on for the first time it ran for a minute or two then the motor started labouring, i then switched it off and removed the belt and let the motor run freely, the motor was fine but the wheel on the pump felt tight and could not turn, i then let the air out and it turned freely again.

I decided to buy new non return valve because the rubber on the old one felt hard and that defnitly was the problem, i then put the new one on and it is doing the same thing, the compressor runs a bit longer about half full and the motor starts labouring again, it only runs when i let the air out.

What could the problem be, can you please help.
___________

It was a good call to check the non-return valve in the line to the tank. If that was preventing access of the compressed air to the tank, then that might have been the cause of your problem.

Normally the check valve fails by leaking, and when the compressor stops and unloads, that leaking check valve lets all the air out of the tank as well as that trapped over the piston.

If it's not the check valve, then all it can be is a problem with the power train.

Your motor may be failing and can't overcome the increasing load as the tank fills, or the compressor head itself has a mechanical issue that bogs the motor down when the pressure builds.

If it is a lubed compressor, make sure the oil sump is full, as low oil could result in friction caused heat and increasing load on the mechanical parts of the compressor as they heat up.

Good luck.

Bill

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Does my compressor need a check valve?

by Mack
(Juneau, AK)

Does my compressor need a check valve? I am building an air compressor. I have an old tank that I refurbished, with a new compressor (two stage) and motor. I am trying to plumb the compressor to the tank and I found out that the connection at the tank has an internal check valve. I want to install 1/2 inch tubing from the compressor to the tank, because the old tubing is 3/8 inch. The new compressor is much bigger and it has 1/2 inch NPT outlet, so I believe that it needs bigger piping. I am basically looking to discard the check valve fitting, because it is too small for the new pipe size. Will this work without a check?

_________________
Bill says...

No, it won't. Without the check valve your tank full of air would bleed to atmosphere every time your compressor stopped.

Read the page on Unloader Valves if you wish more info on this issue.

Cheers,

Bill



Thank you,

Mack Gassan

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