Difference between tank shapes?

Air compressors size & shape question.


What is the difference between dual bottle ones and pancake ones?
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Howdy, and thanks for writing in.

When you say dual bottle, are you referring to those with two small tanks, versus the one tank of a pancake style?

Maybe no difference at all. Let's explore that a bit.

A compressor can vary from another (other than in shape and color) in the following ways:

  • Voltage of motor

  • Motor HP

  • Compression capacity (how high a pressure)

  • Tank size (usually in gallons)


These are pretty much the only things about a compressor that you want to measure.

So, the tank size (whether a pancake style or twin "bottles") is immaterial if both hold enough air for your compressed air using applications.

If the HP and voltage of the motor is the same in both cases, and the storage capacity in gallons is the same or close, and both units are portable enough for you, then I'd opt for the best price and THE BEST WARRANTY!

You might want to read the pages noted below, all on this website.

www.about-air-compressors.com/gallons-to-cubic-feet.html

www.about-air-compressors.com/receivers.html

www.about-air-compressors.com/Compressor-sizing.html

Cheers,

Bill







Comments for Difference between tank shapes?

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Aug 31, 2013
Tank(s)
by: Doug in S.D. CA USA

"So, the tank size (whether a pancake style or twin "bottles") is immaterial if both hold enough air for your compressed air using applications."

I wonder...on my twin tank machine, have noticed that unless it has been running a very long time the one near the output is much cooler than the one closer to the compressor.

This suggests that perhaps the first tank provides some "pre-cooling" by virtue of being somewhat thermally isolated from the second tank.

Then again, maybe not...
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Sure, depending on the tank size and location, there could be some cooling, but really, on a small air compressor with a couple of 2 gallon tanks or so, the air is moving through so fast to the air tool that cooling doesn't have time to happen.

If you wander through the section on compressor generated water, you will see that I do recommend a secondary tank be located as far away from the main tank as possible, and that is to aid in the cooling of the air.

That scenario is typically an industrial air compressor installation.

As it pertains to the fairly small pancake, twin tank, oval tank horizontal tank compressors, for all practical purposes, the tank shape is immaterial.

Cheers,

Bill

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Air receiver size.

by Dan
(England)

i have an air receiver to fit in an existing system basically to dampen any large loads. the receiver has a capacity of 750ltr but the coimpressor flow rate is 1000 CFM. would this reciever be adequate to help resolve the issue.

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Bill says...

Howdy Dan. Thanks for visiting and writing in.

A 1000 CFM compressor is large, and a 750 litre tank isn't, but the real issue as I see it is what is the demand when your system requires air?

While any reservoir will help reduce pulsation from the compressor and provide reserve for the system to allow the compressor to catch up, you need to size the tank based on the draw, not necessarily the compressor size.

More info on this topic right here.

Cheers,

Bill

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Air receiver for a van?

by robin
(yorkshire)

I want air on my van for motor bike weekend sport but dont want to carry a compresser and generator. Is it possible to mount a reciever to underside of my van and fill it from small compresser at home. If so will a larger tank mean longer lasting air supply. Also will it keep pressure for a long time.
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Robin, "Is it possible to mount a receiver to underside of my van and fill it from small compresser at home" absolutely yes, if there is room.

"If so will a larger tank mean longer lasting air supply" Again, yes.

"Also will it keep pressure for a long time." Yes, as long as there are not leaks in fittings and so on.

You might also, depending on what you want the compressed air for, consider a small compressor that can be powered from the accessories plug in the van.

Cheers,

Bill



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Air come out of the first tank and then the second tank?

Is there a way to have the air come out of the first tank and then the second tank?

we have connected our old 60 gallon tank to the new compressor which is also 60 gallon. air goes in fine, but when you are using the compressor air comes out of both tanks at the same time. We thought whe doing this that the air would flow from the first tank and then flow from the second tank. We were told that this would make our compressor come on less frequently
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Dear visitor...

Let us pretend, for just a second, that you have a single 120 gallon air tank. When you open the line from the tank to the air tool, air flows from that tank.

Now, lets cut that 120 gallon tank into two 60 gallon tanks. When you open the line from the tank to the air tool, air flows from that tank. In other words, as far as the compressed air is concerned, it still is all one tank.

If you would be kind enough to indicate as a comment here why the air coming from both tanks is a problem, I'll try to tackle that question.

And, as far as this goes... "We were told that this would make our compressor come on less frequently" you were told correctly. The companion statement to this one is though the compressor runs less frequently with a bigger tank, when the pressure hits the cut in pressure level and the compressor starts, it will run twice as long in order to fill both tanks to the pressure switch cut out.

Cheers,

Bill

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