Radiator clamps used on air line connectors

Per osha and ansi can you use radiator clamps to hold your air hose connectors when installing new connectors.


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Bill says...

Hi Keven. So sorry. I am not an expert on occupational health and safety, so if you want to know if a specific compressed air plumbing process meets their specs, you need to check with them.

If, by a radiator clamp, you refer to a gear clamp (what you will see if you Google Gear Clamp), where you turn a nut and a clamp gets tighter, I have used these for years in plumbing hose over barbed fittings. They are the clamp of choice in this type of application.

Cheers,

Bill

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Compressed air pipe material ~ use galvanized?

by Peter @ Alstar Auto Electric
(Woodinville, WA)

First, Thank you for the info provided on this site. I would like to know what you think of using galvanized pipe instead of copper. This is being used in a small shop, with nearly constant air use.
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Bill says...

Generally speaking, I accept the recommendation of folks more in the know that you not use galvanized steel for compressed air use.

It isn't a safety issue, but rather, galvanized steel is reputed to have the galvanizing inside the pipe crack and flake off, and this travels downstream with your compressed air, and can create problems with your air using appliances.

I wouldn't use copper. My first choice, if I could afford it, would be copper. Next, I'd use a good quality RV Hose (rubber / vinyl ) and last, I'd use polyethylene.

Just my .02 cents worth.

Cheers,

Bill

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compressors water release valve wont shut

by jon
(oregon )

my father recently gave me his sears craftsman 25 gal 5Hp air compressor. i used it a fiew times and it worked great, i opened the valve on the bottom to drain any built up fluid and drained the tank but now when i try to tighten the valve again it will not tighten and now it just leaks a ton of air

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Bill says...

Yup, and it will continue to leak a ton of air unless you close it.

These items are not normally susceptible to mechanical failure. Compressor tank drain valves are pretty simple devices.

As I think about your problem I wonder, could it be possible that you are trying to turn the valve the wrong way? Try turning it the other way and see what happens.

If that doesn't work, you will have to replace the drain. If you can thread it out, consider installing a 90 degree elbow in the drain port, use a short length of poly tubing for air to extend the drain line out to the edge of the tank (easier to get at) and then install a valve there.

Cheers,

Bill

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piping in a air compressor

by lanny forbis
(campbellsville, ky)

i have a kobalt 50 gallon air compressor that i use to run my air tools with and paint cars with as a hobby. my question is if you have a diagram showing the correct way to pipe in a air compressor using a shut off valve, air regulator and a air filter so i wont get water in my air lines. i have it piped in now but i am not sure i have it the correct way. could you please send me a diagram or tell me step by step the correct way to pipe in the air compressor. i am not using a air oiler. i oil my air tools such as rachets and air impact gun through the air nipple that the air hose hooks onto. i do have a air regulator hooked onto my paint guns so i can control the air pressure from the guns instead of running to the air compressor all the time adjusting the air pressure.
any help you can give me i would appreciate it.
thank you
lanny forbis






Bill says...

Lanny, good to hear from you. Thanks for visiting and for writing in.

I'm pretty sure that if you start with this page, read it all, and then wander over to this page, pretty much all you've asked for will be found.

Cheers,

Bill



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Should teflon tape or putty be used when connecting brass air hose fittings together?

by Steve Phares
(Shreveport, LA)

Should teflon tape or some type of putty be used when connecting brass air hose fittings together to prevent air leaking?

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Bill says...

The "should" is up to you.

I'm partial to the sealant putty as it has, I think, less potential to be blown downstream inside the air line to, perhaps, interfere with the operation of a downstream air component.

If you exercise care when using the tape however, it's good to go too. It's just that I've seen what happens to a valve when a piece of tape, carelessly applied to a fitting and overlapping the I.D. of the fitting, gets blown down to the valve, and cause it to stick.

A personal choice, Steve. Whatever you use, use it properly, and you shouldn't have any problem.

Cheers,

Bill

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How to conect a high speed hand piece to the compressor?

by Carlos
(Tampico, Mexico)

hello i want to know how to conect a high speed hand piece to the compressorm i want to see a diagram from the compressor to the hand piece thank u very much!!!!

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Bill says...

Hello Carlos. Much as I would like to help, I can't.

You see, you don't give me any information on the type of coupler you have on your compressor discharge, what the air line size is, what threads and ports are required for the dental tools, and so on.

Read the pages on plumbing, fittings, tube and hose for more information to help you understand why you need to get that information to properly connect your compressor to your air tools.

Cheers,

Bill

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signal line

by Ron Kosmal
(Beaver Falls PA)

I recently purchased an ingersoll rand air compressor. 2stage, 5 hp, single phase. It seems in good shape, and wired correctly. Pneumatically, I have a reservation about the pressure shut off switch. It is mounted to the tank, and has a copper line coming out of it, and the guy that sold it to me said it was just a vent. I think that this is a signal line, and I do not know where to connect it to, or exactly what it does. Is it an unloader signal, and will I need a check valve somewhere if it is an unloader?


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Bill says..

Howdy Ron. Nice to hear from you.

The pressure switch has a line into itself from the tank (usually it's mounted on a pipe that connects right to the tank) allowing it to sense the pressure inside the tank.

When the pressure in the tank gets to the cut out pressure, that trips the mechanical switch, cutting off electricity to the motor.

At the same time, that also opens the unloader valve to allow air trapped over the piston to dump to atmosphere.

Your pressure switch needs a line into it from the tank, and some method of tripping the unloader valve open. If it doesn't, likely your air compressor will pop breakers when it tries to start again.

Maybe send in a photo so we can see what's what?

Cheers,

Bill

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small wood shop airlines

by Phillip
(Houston, texas)

I am just starting a small shop i have a 30 gal compressor. the length of my building is 48' i thought of running a 6" pvc line the length of the building and where i need a air outlet i would reduce to the standard quick disconnect size. Also i was going to mount the 6" on a 2" slope so that i could put a drain on it.do you think this would work to increase my air supply.
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Bill says...

Do not use PVC. It is not rated for compressed air use. You may have a serious accident.

Yes, use a larger pipe for an air main running down your plant.

Many plants use 4" or 6" black pipe as it's rated for the pressure, is fairly cheap, yet has a series of problems of it's own, though not safety related.

Check out the plumbing pages for details.

Cheers,

Bill


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airhose

by matt
(sussex wisc usa)

How do you know the best airline to use in a industrial setting?






Bill says...

Hey Matt. How's it going?

Your question is like asking... how long is a piece of string?

The air mains in most plant environments act as an air reservoir. Therefore, it makes some sense to make them as large as the budget will allow.

If you have read the pages about plumbing systems on this site, you know I'm not a fan of black pipe.

Yet, for large plant environments, that may be the most economical solution. Just make sure you have lots of downstream air preparation equipment to deal with the by products of this lower cost, yet maintenance costly, compressed air plumbing solution.

In a nutshell, if price were no issue, I'd plumb with copper to the drops, use a good quality RVC hose for the drop lines, Tee off to RVC hose to my application, and then into a decent FR (L if needed) before my tools or appliances.

Cheers,

Bill

P.S. check out my new site at www.Negril-Beach-Jamaica.com We went there this winter holiday. Absolutely awesome. Just building the site. Forgive me if it's not complete when you go, OK?

B.W.

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Ring main for compressed air

by Scott
(Honolulu)

I am considering using Schedule 80 PVC in-lieu of steel pipe for a ring main. The air pressure will be approx. 150 psi. Is this a definite NO or is this something that others have tried? Thank you.






Bill says...

Scott, it's a definite NO unless you get the vendor of the plastic pipe to send you (email or letter) telling you that they approve of the application.

More info on plumbing your compressor here.

Cheers,

Bill

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How to draw a circut useing double acting cylinder conncting with push button

by alameer
(Muscat,Oman,Ghulf)

double acting cylinder
push button valves 3/2
5/2 valve

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Bill says...

Hi Alameer. That's part of my "bag of tricks" that I don't give away. It takes quite a while to get the hang of it.

I'll email the circuit drawing to you and instructions, for a fee of $75.00 U.S.

If you are interested, please leave a comment telling me so and what you want the circuit to do.

1)After starting run continuously until the start valve is turned off.

2) Push start valve and run one circuit (extend and retract) and then stop and wait for another start valve actuation.

Cheers,

Bill


Comments for How to draw a circut useing double acting cylinder conncting with push button

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Jun 01, 2010
Thanks
by: Anonymous

Thanks dear I have waited for you answer for long time I have got the answer from someone ells.

Thanks,

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